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The hidden agenda of the political mind : how self-interest shapes our opinions and why we won't admit it / Jason Weeden and Robert Kurzban.

By: Weeden, Jason, 1969- [author.].
Contributor(s): Kurzban, Robert, 1969- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton, NJ ; Oxford : Princeton University Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (363 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400851966; 1400851963; 9781322110936; 132211093X.Subject(s): Social psychology | Self-interest | Interpersonal relationsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Hidden agenda of the political mind.DDC classification: 302 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Part I. Political Minds. Chapter 1. Agendas in Action -- Chapter 2. Investigating Interests -- Chapter 3. Machiavellian Minds -- Part II. Political Issues. Chapter 4. Fighting over Sex: Lifestyle Issues and Religion -- Chapter 5. Rules of the Game: Group Identities and Human Capital -- Chapter 6. Money Matters: Redistribution and Hard-Times Programs -- Part III. Political Coalitions. Chapter 7. The Many Shades of Red and Blue -- Chapter 8. The Republican Coalition -- Chapter 9. The Democratic Coalition -- Part IV. Political Challenges. Chapter 10. An Uncomfortable Take on Political Positions.
Summary: "When it comes to politics, we often perceive our own beliefs as fair and socially beneficial, while seeing opposing views as merely self-serving. But in fact most political views are governed by self-interest, even if we usually don't realize it. Challenging our fiercely held notions about what motivates us politically, this book explores how self-interest divides the public on a host of hot-button issues, from abortion and the legalization of marijuana to same-sex marriage, immigration, affirmative action, and income redistribution. Expanding the notion of interests beyond simple economics, Jason Weeden and Robert Kurzban look at how people's interests clash when it comes to their sex lives, social status, family, and friends. Drawing on a wealth of data, they demonstrate how different groups form distinctive bundles of political positions that often stray far from what we typically think of as liberal or conservative. They show how we engage in unconscious rationalization to justify our political positions, portraying our own views as wise, benevolent, and principled while casting our opponents' views as thoughtless and greedy. While many books on politics seek to provide partisans with new ways to feel good about their own side, The Hidden Agenda of the Political Mind illuminates the hidden drivers of our politics, even if it's a picture neither side will find flattering"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HM1033 .W44 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wq15d Available ocn890441574

Text in English.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part I. Political Minds. Chapter 1. Agendas in Action -- Chapter 2. Investigating Interests -- Chapter 3. Machiavellian Minds -- Part II. Political Issues. Chapter 4. Fighting over Sex: Lifestyle Issues and Religion -- Chapter 5. Rules of the Game: Group Identities and Human Capital -- Chapter 6. Money Matters: Redistribution and Hard-Times Programs -- Part III. Political Coalitions. Chapter 7. The Many Shades of Red and Blue -- Chapter 8. The Republican Coalition -- Chapter 9. The Democratic Coalition -- Part IV. Political Challenges. Chapter 10. An Uncomfortable Take on Political Positions.

"When it comes to politics, we often perceive our own beliefs as fair and socially beneficial, while seeing opposing views as merely self-serving. But in fact most political views are governed by self-interest, even if we usually don't realize it. Challenging our fiercely held notions about what motivates us politically, this book explores how self-interest divides the public on a host of hot-button issues, from abortion and the legalization of marijuana to same-sex marriage, immigration, affirmative action, and income redistribution. Expanding the notion of interests beyond simple economics, Jason Weeden and Robert Kurzban look at how people's interests clash when it comes to their sex lives, social status, family, and friends. Drawing on a wealth of data, they demonstrate how different groups form distinctive bundles of political positions that often stray far from what we typically think of as liberal or conservative. They show how we engage in unconscious rationalization to justify our political positions, portraying our own views as wise, benevolent, and principled while casting our opponents' views as thoughtless and greedy. While many books on politics seek to provide partisans with new ways to feel good about their own side, The Hidden Agenda of the Political Mind illuminates the hidden drivers of our politics, even if it's a picture neither side will find flattering"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Authors Weeden (senior researcher, Pennsylvania Laboratory for Experimental Evolutionary Psychology) and Kurzban (psychology, Univ. of Pennsylvania; founder, Pennsylvania Laboratory for Experimental Evolutionary Psychology; Why Everyone [Else] Is a Hypocrite) have written a well-researched, albeit dense, analysis of the political mind. Drawing upon substantial data extracted from expansive social science research, the authors reveal the complex interplay of factors contributing to our political beliefs and postures. The book is divided into four parts: "Political Minds," "Political Issues," "Political Coalitions," and "Political Challenges." Part 1 discusses ways in which psychology plays into defense of political positions. Part 2 discusses hot-button political issues, such as abortion, while revealing the demographics and interest bases behind political stances. Part 3 elucidates ways in which coalitions are formed from varying political interests. Finally, the last section acknowledges the complexity of the human mind, conceding the limitations of political interest as the sole basis of political beliefs. VERDICT An academic work consisting of over 150 pages scholarly apparatus in addition to the actual text, the book satisfies the intellectual demands of researchers and general readers. Perfect for fans of Thomas Frank's What's the Matter with Kansas? Lynne Maxwell, West Virginia Univ. Coll. of Law Lib., Morgantown (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The number of social scientists pursuing the sources of partisan polarization in the US is approaching critical mass. Much of the debate about the causes of this phenomenon has pivoted around the so-called culture war thesis, which maintains that moral and religious differences have superseded economic divisions in ways that have eliminated common ground between the two parties. Weeden (Pennsylvania Laboratory for Experimental Evolutionary Psychology) and Kurzban (Univ. of Pennsylvania) join this debate by combing through a trove of survey data to make the case that self-interest, not ideology or values, animates political views. Americans' failure to acknowledge how their "inclusive interests" influence their political choices is, Weeden and Kurzban maintain, a consequence of humans' well-documented ability to conjure plausible, self-aggrandizing explanations for choices whose swampy origins lie below the threshold of consciousness. Weeden and Kurzban's argument will trouble those who believe that politics is about more than trying to find ways to satisfy one's interests. It is, however, a case whose big data bona fides will cause skeptics to pause before attributing political differences solely to divergent social, cultural, or religious beliefs. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels --Ronald P. Seyb, Skidmore College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jason Weeden is a senior researcher with the Pennsylvania Laboratory for Experimental Evolutionary Psychology (PLEEP) and a lawyer in Washington, DC. Robert Kurzban is professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and founder of PLEEP. He is the author of Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind (Princeton).

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