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Mourning headband for Hue : an account of the battle for Hue, Vietnam 1968 / Nha Ca ; translated and with an introduction by Olga Dror.

By: Nhã Ca, 1939- [author.].
Contributor(s): Dror, Olga [translator,, writer of introduction.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Bloomington, Ind. : Indiana University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253014320; 0253014328.Uniform titles: Giải khăn sô cho Huế. English Related works: Translation of: Nhã Ca, 1939- Giải khăn sô cho Huế.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mourning headband for Hue.DDC classification: 959.704/3092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Small preface : writing to take responsibility -- First hours -- The Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer -- On a boat trip -- Hodge-podge -- A person from Tu Dam comes back and tells his story -- Going back into the hell of the fighting -- Story from the citadel -- Returning to the old house -- A dog in midstream -- Little child of Hue, little child of Vietnam, I wish you luck.
Scope and content: "Vietnam, January, 1968. As the citizens of Hue are preparing to celebrate Tet, the start of the Lunar New Year, Nhã Ca arrives in the city to attend her father's funeral. Without warning, war erupts all around them, drastically changing or cutting short their lives. After a month of fighting, their beautiful city lies in ruins and thousands of people are dead. Mourning Headband for Hue tells the story of what happened during the fierce North Vietnamese offensive and is an unvarnished and riveting account of war as experienced by ordinary people caught up in the violence"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DS559.5 .N59613 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt16f9909 Available ocn890531172
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
DS559.5 .A86 2010 Writing the War : DS559.5 .L518 2010 Voices from the Vietnam War : DS559.5 .M75 2014 Fighting Shadows in Vietnam : DS559.5 .N59613 2014 Mourning headband for Hue : DS559.62.S68 The American South and the Vietnam War : DS559.62.S68 -- F79 2015 American South and the Vietnam War : DS559.62.U6 Dangerous Grounds.

Includes bibliographical references.

"Vietnam, January, 1968. As the citizens of Hue are preparing to celebrate Tet, the start of the Lunar New Year, Nhã Ca arrives in the city to attend her father's funeral. Without warning, war erupts all around them, drastically changing or cutting short their lives. After a month of fighting, their beautiful city lies in ruins and thousands of people are dead. Mourning Headband for Hue tells the story of what happened during the fierce North Vietnamese offensive and is an unvarnished and riveting account of war as experienced by ordinary people caught up in the violence"-- Provided by publisher.

Small preface : writing to take responsibility -- First hours -- The Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer -- On a boat trip -- Hodge-podge -- A person from Tu Dam comes back and tells his story -- Going back into the hell of the fighting -- Story from the citadel -- Returning to the old house -- A dog in midstream -- Little child of Hue, little child of Vietnam, I wish you luck.

Translated from the Vietnamese.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Vietnam haunts not only the American conscience but also the thousands of Vietnamese who opposed Hanoi. Mourning Headband for Hue, the seminal work by Nhã Ca, one of South Vietnam's leading writers, finally has been published in English. Dror's translation and annotations add immeasurably to this memoir. Unfortunately, the singular achievements of Nhã Ca have gone unrecognized except by old Vietnam hands. During the war, she tried to be neutral, but that proved impossible. Her position changed when she returned to Hue in January 1968 to attend her father's funeral, only to be rudely awakened by the sounds of small arms and artillery fire. Despite the death and destruction that she witnessed during the battle for Hue, Nhã Ca did not employ typical stereotypes of Americans, South Vietnamese, or North Vietnamese regulars and their southern allies. She managed to find some redeeming values among all combatants; however, it is apparent that she believes her generation bears responsibility for the tragic plight that befell Hue and all of Vietnam. This is a worthy addition to accounts that help readers understand the Vietnam War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers. --Christopher C. Lovett, Emporia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Nha Ca, meaning a "courteous, elegant song" or "canticle" in Vietnamese, is the penname of one of the most famous South Vietnamese writers of the second half of the 20th century, whose real name is Tran Th Thu Van. She was born in Hue in 1939 and spent her youth there before moving to Saigon where she became a popular and prolific writer and poet. Initially her works focused on love but starting from the mid-1960s in many of her works she began to describe the fighting, atrocities, and suffering inflicted by the war that was ravaging her country. The most significant and famous of these works is Mourning Headband for Hue, which describes the experience of Vietnamese civilians in Hue during the Tet Offensive. This work was one of the winners of South Vietnam's Presidential Literary Award. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, the Communist authorities put Nha Ca into a prison camp where she remained from 1976 to 1977. Her husband, the poet Tran D Tu, was jailed for twelve years. In 1989, a year after he was released from prison, the couple and their family received political asylum from the Swedish government. Later they moved to the United States and now live in Southern California, where they publish the Vietnamese-language newspaper Viet Bao.</p> <p>Born and raised in Leningrad, USSR, Olga Dror received an MA in Oriental studies from Leningrad State University in 1987 and later pursued an advanced degree from the Institute for Linguistic Studies in the Academy of Sciences, Moscow. She worked for Radio Moscow's Department of Broadcasting to Vietnam. In 1990 she immigrated to Israel, studied international relations at Hebrew University, and worked for the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs in its embassy in Riga, Latvia, from 1994 to 1996. She continued her study of Vietnam and earned a PhD from Cornell University in 2003. Now an associate professor of history at Texas A&M University, she is author of Cult, Culture, and Authority: Princess Lieu Hanh in Vietnamese His</p>

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