Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Economy and the future : a crisis of faith / Jean-Pierre Dupuy ; translated by M.B. DeBevoise.

By: Dupuy, Jean-Pierre, 1941- [author.].
Contributor(s): DeBevoise, M. B [translator.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in violence, mimesis, and culture: Publisher: East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, ©2014Description: 1 online resource (xx, 166 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781609174330; 160917433X; 1628960329; 9781628960327.Uniform titles: Avenir de l'économie. English Subject(s): EconomicsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Economy and the future.DDC classification: 330 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Economy and the problem of evil -- Self-transcendence -- The economics of the end and the end of economics -- Critique of economic reason -- The way out from fatalism.
Summary: A monster stalks the earth-a sluggish, craven, dumb beast that takes fright at the slightest noise and starts at the sight of its own shadow. This monster is the market. The shadow it fears is cast by a light that comes from the future: the Keynesian crisis of expectations. It is this same light that causes the world's leaders to tremble before the beast. They tremble, Jean-Pierre Dupuy says, because they have lost faith in the future. What Dupuy calls Economy has degenerated today into a mad spectacle of unrestrained consumption and speculation. But in its positive form-a truly political economy in which politics, not economics, is predominant-Economy creates not only a sense of trust and confidence but also a belief in the open-endedness of the future without which capitalism cannot function. In this devastating and counterintuitive indictment of the hegemonic pretensions of neoclassical economic theory, Dupuy argues that the immutable and eternal decision of God has been replaced with the unpredictable and capricious judgment of the crowd. The future of mankind will therefore depend on whether it can see through the blindness of orthodox economic thinking.-- Publisher description.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HB173 .D77513 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt7ztd65 Available ocn890674620

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Economy and the problem of evil -- Self-transcendence -- The economics of the end and the end of economics -- Critique of economic reason -- The way out from fatalism.

A monster stalks the earth-a sluggish, craven, dumb beast that takes fright at the slightest noise and starts at the sight of its own shadow. This monster is the market. The shadow it fears is cast by a light that comes from the future: the Keynesian crisis of expectations. It is this same light that causes the world's leaders to tremble before the beast. They tremble, Jean-Pierre Dupuy says, because they have lost faith in the future. What Dupuy calls Economy has degenerated today into a mad spectacle of unrestrained consumption and speculation. But in its positive form-a truly political economy in which politics, not economics, is predominant-Economy creates not only a sense of trust and confidence but also a belief in the open-endedness of the future without which capitalism cannot function. In this devastating and counterintuitive indictment of the hegemonic pretensions of neoclassical economic theory, Dupuy argues that the immutable and eternal decision of God has been replaced with the unpredictable and capricious judgment of the crowd. The future of mankind will therefore depend on whether it can see through the blindness of orthodox economic thinking.-- Publisher description.

Published in French as L'avenir de l'économie: sortir de l'économystification in 2012.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jean-Pierre Dupuy is Professor of Social and Political Philosophy at the École Polytechnique, Paris.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.