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Downwind : a people's history of the nuclear West / Sarah Alisabeth Fox.

By: Fox, Sarah Alisabeth, 1981- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 285 pages) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803269491; 0803269498; 0803269501; 9780803269507; 080326951X; 9780803269514.Subject(s): Uranium miners -- Health and hygiene -- West (U.S.) | Uranium mines and mining -- Health aspects -- Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah | Nuclear weapons testing victims -- West (U.S.) | Nuclear weapons -- Testing -- Health aspects | Nuclear industry -- Health aspects -- West (U.S.) | Radiation -- Health aspects -- West (U.S.)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Downwind.DDC classification: 363.7380978 LOC classification: RA569 | .F69 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Living under the cloud -- Unearthing yellow monsters -- Home on the range -- Locally grown -- Writing down names -- Critical mass -- Conclusion.
Summary: An unflinching tale that reveals the intentional disregard for human and animal life through nuclear testing by the federal government and uranium extraction by mining corporations during and after the Cold War. Sarah Alisabeth Fox highlights the personal cost of nuclear testing and uranium extraction in the American West through extensive interviews with "downwinders," the Native American and non-Native residents of the Great Basin region affected by nuclear environmental contamination and nuclear-testing fallout. These downwinders tell tales of communities ravaged by cancer epidemics, farmers and ranchers economically ruined by massive crop and animal deaths, and Native miners working in dangerous conditions without proper safety equipment so that the government could surreptitiously study the effects of radiation on humans. In chilling detail Downwind brings to light the stories and concerns of these groups whose voices have been silenced and marginalized for decades in the name of "patriotism" and "national security."--Publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA569 .F69 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d9nk3t Available ocn890750079

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Living under the cloud -- Unearthing yellow monsters -- Home on the range -- Locally grown -- Writing down names -- Critical mass -- Conclusion.

An unflinching tale that reveals the intentional disregard for human and animal life through nuclear testing by the federal government and uranium extraction by mining corporations during and after the Cold War. Sarah Alisabeth Fox highlights the personal cost of nuclear testing and uranium extraction in the American West through extensive interviews with "downwinders," the Native American and non-Native residents of the Great Basin region affected by nuclear environmental contamination and nuclear-testing fallout. These downwinders tell tales of communities ravaged by cancer epidemics, farmers and ranchers economically ruined by massive crop and animal deaths, and Native miners working in dangerous conditions without proper safety equipment so that the government could surreptitiously study the effects of radiation on humans. In chilling detail Downwind brings to light the stories and concerns of these groups whose voices have been silenced and marginalized for decades in the name of "patriotism" and "national security."--Publisher description.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Sarah Alisabeth Fox is a freelance writer and editor. Her articles and reviews have appeared in Montana, the Magazine of Western History and Western Historical Quarterly .</p>

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