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Binational human rights : the U.S.-Mexico experience / edited by William Paul Simmons and Carol Mueller.

Contributor(s): Simmons, William Paul, 1965- [editor.] | Mueller, Carol McClurg [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Pennsylvania studies in human rights: Publisher: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (vi, 300 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812209983; 0812209982; 0812246284; 9780812246285; 1322513872; 9781322513874.Subject(s): Human rights -- Mexico | Criminal justice, Administration of -- Mexico | Illegal aliens -- United States -- Social conditions | Mexicans -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Binational human rights.DDC classification: 323.0972 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Reflections on immigration, binational policies, and human rights tragedies / Miguel Escobar-Valdez -- Sexual violence against migrant women and children / William Paul Simmons and Michelle Téllez -- Immigration enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border : where human rights and national sovereignty collide / Timothy J. Dunn -- Politics of death in the drug war : the right to kill and suspensions of human rights in Mexico, 2000-2012 / Julie A. Murphy Erfani -- Migration, violence and "security primacy" at the Guatemala-Mexico border / Luis Alfredo Arriola Vega -- Binational roots of the femicides in Ciudad Juárez / Carol Mueller -- Reflections on antiviolence civil society organizations in Ciudad Juárez / Clara Jusidman -- Persistence of femicide amid transnational activist networks / Kathleen Staudt -- Transnational advocacy for human rights in contemporary Mexico / Alejandro Anaya Muñoz -- Restrictions on U.S. security assistance and their limitations in promoting changes to the human rights situation in Mexico / Maureen Meyer -- Multiple states of exception, structural violence, and prospects for change / William Paul Simmons.
Summary: "Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations, particularly the United States."--Publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JC599.M6 .H85 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1287p25 Available ocn891400033

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on print version record.

Reflections on immigration, binational policies, and human rights tragedies / Miguel Escobar-Valdez -- Sexual violence against migrant women and children / William Paul Simmons and Michelle Téllez -- Immigration enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border : where human rights and national sovereignty collide / Timothy J. Dunn -- Politics of death in the drug war : the right to kill and suspensions of human rights in Mexico, 2000-2012 / Julie A. Murphy Erfani -- Migration, violence and "security primacy" at the Guatemala-Mexico border / Luis Alfredo Arriola Vega -- Binational roots of the femicides in Ciudad Juárez / Carol Mueller -- Reflections on antiviolence civil society organizations in Ciudad Juárez / Clara Jusidman -- Persistence of femicide amid transnational activist networks / Kathleen Staudt -- Transnational advocacy for human rights in contemporary Mexico / Alejandro Anaya Muñoz -- Restrictions on U.S. security assistance and their limitations in promoting changes to the human rights situation in Mexico / Maureen Meyer -- Multiple states of exception, structural violence, and prospects for change / William Paul Simmons.

"Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations, particularly the United States."--Publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book provides a binational understanding of the complexities surrounding human rights abuses on the US-Mexico border. One major contribution of this book is to demonstrate how a policy decision made by the US or Mexican government can have consequences on the other side of the border and how that can lead to human rights violations in both countries. For example, the militarization of the US border, coupled with Mexico's response to the drug war, has affected immigrants on both sides of the border. The contributors employ a variety of qualitative research methodologies that substantiate the central argument that "the binational context, especially but not solely US policies, has created states of exception that exacerbate existing structural violence to render vulnerable individuals more susceptible to human rights abuses." The concluding chapter ends with a pessimistic view of the future of human rights in the region. Revealing the unintended consequences of policy decisions and ways they affect vulnerable populations on the ground is one of the most important contributions of this work. The contributors demonstrate a high level of engagement with the subject matter and, most important, the subjects. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. --Irasema Coronado, University of Texas at El Paso

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William Paul Simmons is Associate Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Arizona and author of Human Rights Law and the Marginalized Other and An-Archy and Justice: An Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas's Political Thought. Carol Mueller is Professor of Sociology and former Director of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. She is coeditor of Repression and Mobilization and Frontiers of Social Movement Theory, among other titles.

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