Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance / Ada Palmer.

By: Palmer, AdaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksI Tatti studies in Italian Renaissance history: Publisher: Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 372 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674736054; 0674736052Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading Lucretius in the RenaissanceDDC classification: 871/.01 LOC classification: PA6495 | .P35 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Religion trampled underfoot: Epicurus, atomism, atheism and skepticism in the Renaissance -- Unchristian opinion: Lucretius' first Renaissance readers -- Between fits of madness: ancient reference and proto-biographies -- The lofty madness of wise Lucretius: the Renaissance biographies -- The poverty of the language: the Lucretian print tradition -- Deceived but not betrayed.
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PA6495 .P35 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qdssc Available ocn892852873

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Religion trampled underfoot: Epicurus, atomism, atheism and skepticism in the Renaissance -- Unchristian opinion: Lucretius' first Renaissance readers -- Between fits of madness: ancient reference and proto-biographies -- The lofty madness of wise Lucretius: the Renaissance biographies -- The poverty of the language: the Lucretian print tradition -- Deceived but not betrayed.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

-------------Adopting a distinctive quantitative methodology, Palmer (history, Univ. of Chicago) presents a cumulative analytical survey of the paratexts routinely inserted by humanist readers and publishers into the earliest manuscripts, incunabula, and 16th-century printed editions of De rerum natura--paratexts that contributed to eventual "definitive" textual rendition of Lucretius. In her conclusion, she posits a significant evolution in the "reading" of Lucretius that in 15th-century Italy focused more on philological repair and textual recovery than on the poem's heterodox content and climaxed in 1565 (in France and the Low Countries), when inexpensive pocket copies enabled readers to focus more on content "absorption than repair." This radical transformation of the received text meant that the 17th-century audience had a new freedom in its reception of De rerum natura as a foundational element of modernity. Released in the "I Tatti Studies in Italian Renaissance History" series, Palmer's distinguished volume is a link in the catena of recent Lucretian scholarship, a literature that includes Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve (CH, Mar'12, 49-3702), Gerard Passannante's The Lucretian Renaissance (CH, Apr'12, 49-4301), and Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science, ed. by Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison, and Alison Sharrock (CH, Mar'14, 51-3681). Superbly supported with excellent portrayals of original manuscript pages and full apparatus. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Joseph S. Louzonis, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Palmer Ada :

Ada Palmer is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Chicago.

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