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Indexing it all : the subject in the age of documentation, information, and data / Ronald E. Day.

By: Day, Ronald E, 1959- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.History and foundations of information science: Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Mit Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 170 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0262322773; 9780262322775; 1322151342; 9781322151342.Subject(s): Documentation -- History | Documentation -- Social aspects | Information science -- Philosophy | Information science -- Social aspects | Indexing -- Social aspects | Subject (Philosophy) | Information technology -- Social aspectsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Indexing it all.DDC classification: 025.04 LOC classification: Z1001 | .D39 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Inroduction -- Social computing and the indexing of the whole -- The document as a subject : androids -- The modern documentary tradition and site and time of critique.
Abstract: "In this book, Ronald Day offers a critical history of the modern tradition of documentation. Focusing on the documentary index (understood as a mode of social positioning), and drawing on the work of the French documentalist Suzanne Briet, Day explores the understanding and uses of indexicality. He examines the transition as indexes went from being explicit professional structures that mediated users and documents to being implicit infrastructural devices used in everyday information and communication acts. Doing so, he also traces three epistemic eras in the representation of individuals and groups, first in the forms of documents, then information, then data. Day investigates five cases from the modern tradition of documentation. He considers the socio-technical instrumentalism of Paul Otlet, "the father of European documentation" (contrasting it to the hermeneutic perspective of Martin Heidegger); the shift from documentation to information science and the accompanying transform tion of persons and texts into users and information; social media's use of algorithms, further subsuming persons and texts; attempts to build android robots--to embody human agency within an information system that resembles a human being; and social "big data" as a technique of neoliberal governance that employs indexing and analytics for purposes of surveillance. Finally, Day considers the status of critique and judgment at a time when people and their rights of judgment are increasingly mediated, displaced, and replaced by modern documentary techniques."
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
Z1001 .D39 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qf68x Available ocn892911082

Includes bibliographical references (pages 155-167) and index.

Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Inroduction -- 2. Paul Otlet : friends and books for information needs -- 3. Representing documents and persons in information systems : library and information science and citation indexing and analysis -- 4. Social computing and the indexing of the whole -- 5. The document as a subject : androids -- 6. Governing expression : social big data and neoliberalism -- 7. Conclusion. The modern documentary tradition and site and time of critique.

"In this book, Ronald Day offers a critical history of the modern tradition of documentation. Focusing on the documentary index (understood as a mode of social positioning), and drawing on the work of the French documentalist Suzanne Briet, Day explores the understanding and uses of indexicality. He examines the transition as indexes went from being explicit professional structures that mediated users and documents to being implicit infrastructural devices used in everyday information and communication acts. Doing so, he also traces three epistemic eras in the representation of individuals and groups, first in the forms of documents, then information, then data. Day investigates five cases from the modern tradition of documentation. He considers the socio-technical instrumentalism of Paul Otlet, "the father of European documentation" (contrasting it to the hermeneutic perspective of Martin Heidegger); the shift from documentation to information science and the accompanying transform tion of persons and texts into users and information; social media's use of algorithms, further subsuming persons and texts; attempts to build android robots--to embody human agency within an information system that resembles a human being; and social "big data" as a technique of neoliberal governance that employs indexing and analytics for purposes of surveillance. Finally, Day considers the status of critique and judgment at a time when people and their rights of judgment are increasingly mediated, displaced, and replaced by modern documentary techniques."

Print version record.

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CHOICE Review

This work is a history of documentation and indexing spanning the information age (20th-21st centuries) and creates a "documentary variation of 'social positioning theory.'" Day (Indiana Univ. Bloomington) attempts to heighten understanding and uses of indexicality, examines indexing's progression from explicit to implicit, and reviews his identified three eras of indexing (documents, information, and data). The volume is divided into seven chapters, with chapters one and seven serving as introductory and concluding chapters, respectively. Chapters 2-6 are historical and conceptual case studies. A contrast of information needs and philosophies constitutes chapter 2, namely Otlet's "books as friends" versus Heidegger's stance on libraries. Chapter 3 discusses the transition from documents to information science, as suggested by key scholars such as Shannon, Buckland, Cronin, and Small. Chapter 4 encompasses information/indexing algorithms and systems, how systems influence and are influenced by culture and social networking, and resulting trends. Chapter 5 discusses how technology "mediates or changes information," particularly as it relates to androids or robots. Finally, the impacts of big data, information governance, and "surface" reading are covered in chapter 6. Ironically, the text itself is sparsely indexed; however, references, endnotes, and chapter summaries are provided to aid the reader. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Brenda G. Turner, Faulkner University

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