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Secrecy in the sunshine era : the promise and failures of U.S. open government laws / Jason Ross Arnold.

By: Arnold, Jason Ross [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700620425; 0700620427.Subject(s): Freedom of information -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Secrecy in the sunshine era.DDC classification: 342.73/0662 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Despite laws such as the Freedom of Information Act and Government in the Sunshine Act among others that promise an open and transparent government, maintaining the secrecy of government actions and proceedings remains too often the default reaction of federal government officials. In this book Jason Arnold explores the surprising extent of government secrecy in both national security and domestic policy areas in administrations since the 1970s. He lays out the costs of excessive secrecy, shows how government agencies keep their proceedings secret, and suggests remedies to promote a more open government. This is a timely contribution to the national debates about government secrecy sparked by the actions of Edward Snowden and the revelation about the extent of secret government spying on civilians here and abroad"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF5753 .A765 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ch7946 Available ocn893600189

Includes index.

"Despite laws such as the Freedom of Information Act and Government in the Sunshine Act among others that promise an open and transparent government, maintaining the secrecy of government actions and proceedings remains too often the default reaction of federal government officials. In this book Jason Arnold explores the surprising extent of government secrecy in both national security and domestic policy areas in administrations since the 1970s. He lays out the costs of excessive secrecy, shows how government agencies keep their proceedings secret, and suggests remedies to promote a more open government. This is a timely contribution to the national debates about government secrecy sparked by the actions of Edward Snowden and the revelation about the extent of secret government spying on civilians here and abroad"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With debates over government surveillance of private citizens, expansion of executive power, and data gathering playing center stage in contemporary politics, the fact that the cloaked behavior of the government goes much deeper and is perhaps more insidious within the everyday functions of government is often forgotten. Arnold (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.) details the extent to which administrations since the adoption of sunshine legislation have worked, not so quietly, to find ways around those laws. Arnold also notes how much of this subterfuge was accomplished with the help of the courts and Congress. Though a slow read at times, the book is well documented with well over 100 pages of notes. Arnold warns that without public vigilance, resulting in Congressional fortitude, the transparency that makes democracy possible will be lost. He offers no single silver bullet or surefire way to ensure presidents will not try to hide even the simplest of governing tasks from scrutiny. Absent a "loud, sustained roar" from the public, only incremental change and "whistle-blowing done right" can ensure that transparency remains. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. --Jim Twombly, Elmira College

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