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Sacrificing childhood : children and the Soviet state in the great patriotic war / Julie K. deGraffenried.

By: DeGraffenried, Julie K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Modern war studies.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700620388; 0700620389.Subject(s): Children and war -- Soviet UnionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Sacrificing childhood.DDC classification: 940.53/47083 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- The children's war -- Mobilizing the young : war work for Soviet children -- Defining the heroic : values for Soviet children at war -- The art of conflict : images of children and for children at war -- The "happy childhood" resumed? : or, the return of the Elka -- Conclusion.
Summary: "Julie deGraffenried chronicles the taxing and often desperate lives of Russian children during World War II, or the Great Patriotic War as the Soviet Union called it. She illuminates not only the dire circumstances of Soviet children during the war but also the ways in which the Soviet system reconstructed childhood to better serve the state's war aims"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "During the Soviet Union's Great Patriotic War, from 1941 to 1945, as many as 24 million of its citizens died. 14 million were children ages fourteen or younger. And for those who survived, the suffering was far from over. The prewar Stalinist vision of a 'happy childhood' nurtured by a paternal, loving state had given way, out of necessity. What replaced it--the dictate that children be prepared to sacrifice everything, including childhood itself--created a generation all too familiar with deprivation, violence, and death. The experience of these children, and the role of the state in shaping their narrative, are the subject of this book, which fills in a critical but neglected chapter in the Soviet story and in the history of World War II. In Sacrificing Childhood, Julie deGraffenried chronicles the lives of the Soviet wartime children and the uses to which they were put--not just as combatants or workers in factories and collective farms, but also as fodder for propaganda, their plight a proof of the enemy's depredations. Not all Soviet children lived through the war in the same way; but in the circumstances of a child in occupied Belarus or in the Leningrad blockade, a young deportee in Siberia or evacuee in Uzbekistan, deGraffenried finds common threads that distinguish the child's experience of war from the adult's. The state's expectations, however, were the same for all children, as we see here in children's mass media and literature and the communications of party organizations and institutions, most notably the Young Pioneers, whose relentless wartime activities made them ideal for the purposes of propaganda. The first in-depth study of where Soviet children fit into the history of the war, Sacrificing Childhood also offers an unprecedented view of the state's changing expectations for its children, and how this figured in the nature and direction of post-war Soviet society"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D810.C4 D36 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ckpbmk Available ocn893642177

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- The children's war -- Mobilizing the young : war work for Soviet children -- Defining the heroic : values for Soviet children at war -- The art of conflict : images of children and for children at war -- The "happy childhood" resumed? : or, the return of the Elka -- Conclusion.

"Julie deGraffenried chronicles the taxing and often desperate lives of Russian children during World War II, or the Great Patriotic War as the Soviet Union called it. She illuminates not only the dire circumstances of Soviet children during the war but also the ways in which the Soviet system reconstructed childhood to better serve the state's war aims"-- Provided by publisher.

"During the Soviet Union's Great Patriotic War, from 1941 to 1945, as many as 24 million of its citizens died. 14 million were children ages fourteen or younger. And for those who survived, the suffering was far from over. The prewar Stalinist vision of a 'happy childhood' nurtured by a paternal, loving state had given way, out of necessity. What replaced it--the dictate that children be prepared to sacrifice everything, including childhood itself--created a generation all too familiar with deprivation, violence, and death. The experience of these children, and the role of the state in shaping their narrative, are the subject of this book, which fills in a critical but neglected chapter in the Soviet story and in the history of World War II. In Sacrificing Childhood, Julie deGraffenried chronicles the lives of the Soviet wartime children and the uses to which they were put--not just as combatants or workers in factories and collective farms, but also as fodder for propaganda, their plight a proof of the enemy's depredations. Not all Soviet children lived through the war in the same way; but in the circumstances of a child in occupied Belarus or in the Leningrad blockade, a young deportee in Siberia or evacuee in Uzbekistan, deGraffenried finds common threads that distinguish the child's experience of war from the adult's. The state's expectations, however, were the same for all children, as we see here in children's mass media and literature and the communications of party organizations and institutions, most notably the Young Pioneers, whose relentless wartime activities made them ideal for the purposes of propaganda. The first in-depth study of where Soviet children fit into the history of the war, Sacrificing Childhood also offers an unprecedented view of the state's changing expectations for its children, and how this figured in the nature and direction of post-war Soviet society"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

DeGraffenried (Baylor Univ.) offers a compelling glimpse into the lives of Soviet children during WW II. Soviet childhood under Stalin in the 1930s was an idealized time; children were nurtured and even treated with sentimental reverence. During the war, however, more than 14 million Soviet children perished. DeGraffenried illuminates that the damage of the war went beyond the loss of life. The entire experience of childhood was altered and in most cases destroyed. The deprivation children experienced included homelessness, starvation, and lack of schooling. The war's lingering effects resulted in continuing nutritional problems, psychological damage from intense exposure to violence, and immunity deficiencies. One of the book's most interesting parts is the discussion of how the activities of the Young Pioneers intensified in an effort to propagandize the children and the war effort. A welcome addition to the developing literature on childhood in Russian and Soviet history from authors such as Catriona Kelly, Children's World: Growing up in Russia, 1890-1991 (CH, Jan'09, 46-2833), and Larry E. Holmes, The Kremlin and the Schoolhouse: Reforming Education in Soviet Russia, 1917-1931 (CH, Jul'92, 29-6417). Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, public libraries. --William Benton Whisenhunt, College of DuPage

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