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Diplomacy's value : creating security in 1920s Europe and the contemporary Middle East / Brian C. Rathbun.

By: Rathbun, Brian C, 1973- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Cornell studies in security affairs: Publisher: Ithaca ; London : Cornell University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (xi, 267 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780801455063; 0801455065.Subject(s): DiplomacyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Diplomacy's valueDDC classification: 327.4009/042 LOC classification: JZ1405 | .R37 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The value and values of diplomacy -- Creating value: a psychological theory of diplomacy -- Tabling the issue: two Franco-British failures of diplomacy -- Setting the table: German reassurance, British brokering and French understanding -- Getting to the table: the diplomatic perils of the exchange of notes -- Cards on the table: the negotiation of the treaty of mutual guarantee and the spirit of Locarno -- Turning the tables: reparations, early evacuation and the Hague conference -- Additional value: the rise and fall of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process -- Searching for Stresemann: the lessons of the 1920s for diplomacy and the Middle East peace process.
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JZ1405 .R37 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1287cbz Available ocn894227822
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JZ1405 .C43 2013 International Law and Diplomacy. JZ1405 .D58 2017 Diplomatic material : JZ1405 .I55 2011 Inside a U.S. embassy : JZ1405 .R37 2014 Diplomacy's value : JZ1410 .D58 2019 Diplomatic security : JZ1418 .C384 2013 The Contemporary Embassy : JZ1418.H65 2012 Embassy in Grosvenor Square :

The value and values of diplomacy -- Creating value: a psychological theory of diplomacy -- Tabling the issue: two Franco-British failures of diplomacy -- Setting the table: German reassurance, British brokering and French understanding -- Getting to the table: the diplomatic perils of the exchange of notes -- Cards on the table: the negotiation of the treaty of mutual guarantee and the spirit of Locarno -- Turning the tables: reparations, early evacuation and the Hague conference -- Additional value: the rise and fall of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process -- Searching for Stresemann: the lessons of the 1920s for diplomacy and the Middle East peace process.

Includes bibliographical references.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Diplomacy is how states communicate and negotiate in an effort to pursue their interests in international relations. There are different diplomatic styles. Rathbun (Univ. of Southern California) explains that diplomats choose from a variety of diplomatic styles, including coercive bargaining, pragmatic statecraft, and reasoned dialogue, but argues that choice of style is the product of different psychological motivations revealed in decision makers' ideological predispositions. The particular combination of diplomatic styles state leaders use gives way to particular interactions, which he calls the prevailing spirit of negotiations. His constructive argument therefore amounts to a behavioralization of existing international relations traditions. Rathbun argues that policy makers should think of realism, rationalism, and liberalism not as theories that capture the singular essence of diplomacy but as sets of prescriptions that guide behavior. He argues that coercive bargaining and pragmatic statecraft share features of liberal diplomacy. Liberal diplomacy rests on goodwill and is motivated by the desire to find a win-win outcome for all sides. Therefore, finding the middle point requires frank discussion, confidence building, and fair dealing. Rathbun focuses on behavioralization in an effort to identify those diplomats who are inclined to engage in reasoned dialogue facilitated by egalitarianism and genuine empathy. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. --Khodr M. Zaarour, Shaw University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Brian C. Rathbun is Associate Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Partisan Interventions: European Party Politics and Peace Enforcement in the Balkans , also from Cornell, and Trust in International Cooperation: International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics, and American Multilateralism. </p>

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