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The settlers' empire : colonialism and state formation in America's Old Northwest / Bethel Saler.

By: Saler, Bethel [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Early American studies: Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Edition: First edition.Description: 1 online resource (393 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812291216; 0812291212.Subject(s): Statehood (American politics) -- History | Indians of North America -- Government relations | Indians of North America -- Northwest, Old | Indians of North America -- WisconsinAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Settlers' empire : colonialism and state formation in America's Old Northwest.DDC classification: 977/.01 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; 1. The National State Faces West; 2. The First Federal Colonialism in the Lower Northwest; 3. The Treaty Polity; 4. Exchanging Economies; 5. A ''Peculiarly Missionary Ground''; 6. The Cornerstones of Marriage and Family; 7. State of Imagination; Epilogue: The Historical Present; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Acknowledgments.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F479 .S25 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qh4h7 Available ocn896853304

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Cover; Contents; Introduction; 1. The National State Faces West; 2. The First Federal Colonialism in the Lower Northwest; 3. The Treaty Polity; 4. Exchanging Economies; 5. A ''Peculiarly Missionary Ground''; 6. The Cornerstones of Marriage and Family; 7. State of Imagination; Epilogue: The Historical Present; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Acknowledgments.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Saler (Haverford College) explores how in Wisconsin, the evolving relationships among Indians, Creoles, settlers, and federal agents shaped contingent territorial policies "without any over-arching plan." In her intriguing work, she begins by highlighting how US administrative actions in the Northwest Territory after American independence created one set of rules for whites to be incorporated into the federal union and a different set for "quasi-foreign" Indian groups. The author then delves into the long colonial process in Wisconsin, where for decades, Indians and Creoles dominated and maintained a fur trade that facilitated traditional customs and networks. After a tide of American lead miners arrived in the late 1820s, federal agents sponsored missionaries who treated Indians differently from whites. At the same time, territorial courts began to enforce American marriage norms as the primary means of establishing US sovereignty. Yet even after the huge tide of settlers in the 1840s, leading to statehood in 1848, the many remaining Indians and Métis continued to shape the new state's identity and institutions. Saler's use of sociological and anthropological frameworks complicates the narrative but helps make sense of Wisconsin's "messy" history, and the book is quite readable. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Daniel Richard Mandell, Truman State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bethel Saler is Associate Professor of History at Haverford College.

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