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Mimetic politics : dyadic patterns in global politics / Roberto Farneti.

By: Farneti, Roberto [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in violence, mimesis, and culture: Publisher: East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (194 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1609174453; 9781609174453; 9781628951370; 1628951370; 9781628961379; 1628961376; 1611861489; 9781611861488.Other title: 楍敭楴潐楬楴獣 Other title: Dyadic patterns in global politics.Subject(s): Political science -- Cross-cultural studies | Violence -- Social aspects | Imitation -- Cross-cultural studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mimetic politics.DDC classification: 320.01 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A new (mimetic) paradigm for our postsacrificial times -- The mimetic context of the "new wars" -- Cleavage lines in global politics -- A mimetic perspective on conflict resolution -- A political theology of the empty tomb -- Epilogue : A genealogy of "planetary reciprocity."
Summary: Farneti highlights phenomena that political scientists have consistently failed to notice, such as reciprocal imitation as the fundamental cause of human discord, the mechanisms of spontaneous polarization in human conflicts (i.e., the emergence of dyads or "doubles"), and the strange and ever-growing resemblance of the mimetic rivals, which is precisely what pushes them to annihilate each other--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JA86 .F376 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt14bs0rm Available ocn896853874

Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-172) and index.

A new (mimetic) paradigm for our postsacrificial times -- The mimetic context of the "new wars" -- Cleavage lines in global politics -- A mimetic perspective on conflict resolution -- A political theology of the empty tomb -- Epilogue : A genealogy of "planetary reciprocity."

Farneti highlights phenomena that political scientists have consistently failed to notice, such as reciprocal imitation as the fundamental cause of human discord, the mechanisms of spontaneous polarization in human conflicts (i.e., the emergence of dyads or "doubles"), and the strange and ever-growing resemblance of the mimetic rivals, which is precisely what pushes them to annihilate each other--Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Drawing on the work of René Girard, Farneti (Free Univ., Italy) proposes a radical departure from standard theoretical approaches in political science. Mimetic theory conceives of the individual as driven to imitate others, including adopting the goals and even the desires of others, which leads to increasing similarity to one another and to their becoming rivals. Individuals do not recognize this pattern in their behavior; they imagine themselves as self-directing agents seeking their own goals, which, under conditions of scarcity, may lead them into conflict. Mimetic theory holds that this self-understanding is illusory: individuals' goals reflect the rivalry rather than leading them to become rivals. Thus, the key concept of mimetic theory is not the individual nor the group but the dyad, or "double," whose rivalry will tend to escalate without limit. The book sets out a general account of mimetic theory and uses it to analyze contemporary developments in international politics to show its superiority to existing theories. The book is quite accessible; it will be of most interest to graduate students and scholars who focus on either normative or empirical theories of politics. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. --J. Donald Moon, Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Roberto Farneti is Assistant Professor of Politics at the School of Economics and Management of the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano in Italy.

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