Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Fighting over the founders : how we remember the American Revolution / Andrew M. Schocket.

By: Schocket, Andrew M [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : New York University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 253 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814771150; 0814771157.Subject(s): Collective memory -- United States | National characteristics, American | Political culture -- United States | Popular culture -- United States | Public opinion -- United States | Historical reenactments -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Fighting over the founders.DDC classification: 973.3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Truths that are not self-evident : the Revolution in political speech -- We have not yet begun to write : historians and Founders chic -- We the tourists : the Revolution at museums and historical sites -- Give me liberty's kids : how the Revolution has been televised and filmed -- To re-create a more perfect union : originalism, the Tea Party, and reenactors.
Action note: ebrary ddaScope and content: "The American Revolution is all around us. It is pictured as big as billboards and as small as postage stamps, evoked in political campaigns and car advertising campaigns, relived in museums and revised in computer games. As the nation's founding moment, the American Revolution serves as a source of powerful founding myths, and remains the most accessible and most contested event in U.S. history: more than any other, it stands as a proxy for how Americans perceive the nation's aspirations. Americans' increased fascination with the Revolution over the past two decades represents more than interest in the past. It's also a site to work out the present, and the future. What are we using the Revolution to debate? In Fighting over the Founders, Andrew M. Schocket explores how politicians, screenwriters, activists, biographers, jurists, museum professionals, and reenactors portray the American Revolution. Identifying competing 'essentialist' and 'organicist' interpretations of the American Revolution, Schocket shows how today's memories of the American Revolution reveal American's conflicted ideas about class, about race, and about gender--as well as the nature of history itself. Fighting over the Founders plumbs our views of the past and the present, and illuminates our ideas of what United States means to its citizens in the new millennium"-- Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E209 .S36 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1287jfx Available ocn896872742

"The American Revolution is all around us. It is pictured as big as billboards and as small as postage stamps, evoked in political campaigns and car advertising campaigns, relived in museums and revised in computer games. As the nation's founding moment, the American Revolution serves as a source of powerful founding myths, and remains the most accessible and most contested event in U.S. history: more than any other, it stands as a proxy for how Americans perceive the nation's aspirations. Americans' increased fascination with the Revolution over the past two decades represents more than interest in the past. It's also a site to work out the present, and the future. What are we using the Revolution to debate? In Fighting over the Founders, Andrew M. Schocket explores how politicians, screenwriters, activists, biographers, jurists, museum professionals, and reenactors portray the American Revolution. Identifying competing 'essentialist' and 'organicist' interpretations of the American Revolution, Schocket shows how today's memories of the American Revolution reveal American's conflicted ideas about class, about race, and about gender--as well as the nature of history itself. Fighting over the Founders plumbs our views of the past and the present, and illuminates our ideas of what United States means to its citizens in the new millennium"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Truths that are not self-evident : the Revolution in political speech -- We have not yet begun to write : historians and Founders chic -- We the tourists : the Revolution at museums and historical sites -- Give me liberty's kids : how the Revolution has been televised and filmed -- To re-create a more perfect union : originalism, the Tea Party, and reenactors.

Print version record.

ebrary dda UPB

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.