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Mea culpa : lessons on law and regret from U.S. history / Steven W. Bender.

By: Bender, Steven [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York ; London : New York University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (ix, 241 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479876730; 1479876739.Subject(s): Human rights -- United States -- History | Regret -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Minorities -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History | Discrimination -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History | Marginality, Social -- Political aspects -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Mea culpaDDC classification: 172/.10973 LOC classification: KF4749 | .B39 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Regret: frameworks for prediction -- What dehumanization predicts: the landscapes of future regret -- Aliens, illegals, wetbacks, and anchor babies: the dehumanization of immigrant -- Workers and their families -- Beasts of burden: farmworkers in the U.S. field of dreams -- The wages of poverty: inequality, welfare queens, and the homeless -- Sexuality and dehumanization: homophobia in U.S. law and life -- Dehumanizing criminals: the monsters of death row -- Flying while Muslim: "ragheads" and human rights -- From slavery to the new Jim Crow of mass incarceration: the ongoing -- Dehumanization of African Americans -- You've come a long way, baby! Gender and dehumanization -- International dehumanization -- Conclusion: a blueprint for humanization through compassion.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KF4749 .B39 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1287jdd Available ocn896872932

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Regret: frameworks for prediction -- What dehumanization predicts: the landscapes of future regret -- Aliens, illegals, wetbacks, and anchor babies: the dehumanization of immigrant -- Workers and their families -- Beasts of burden: farmworkers in the U.S. field of dreams -- The wages of poverty: inequality, welfare queens, and the homeless -- Sexuality and dehumanization: homophobia in U.S. law and life -- Dehumanizing criminals: the monsters of death row -- Flying while Muslim: "ragheads" and human rights -- From slavery to the new Jim Crow of mass incarceration: the ongoing -- Dehumanization of African Americans -- You've come a long way, baby! Gender and dehumanization -- International dehumanization -- Conclusion: a blueprint for humanization through compassion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bender (law, Seattle Univ.), through the prism of regret for policies enacted as a result of dehumanization of particular groups, presents an admirable intersectional synthesis of current and past legal marginalization. Many of the chapters are on immigration (his main area of research), but the book also includes chapters on class, race, sexuality, gender, and religion. The breadth of topics and the connections made among the various forms of identity is laudable. Bender also emphasizes the inconsistent, and often negative, role of courts in preventing the dehumanization of groups, and he calls for judges to recognize and compensate for this legacy. The media is also criticized for fostering negative stereotypes. Ultimately, however, his remedy for the problem is to instill more compassion in the general public as a way to prevent further dehumanization. Overall, the analysis could have been more deeply developed and consistent, as much of the narrative is fairly familiar to students and scholars of inequality. However, the contribution that the author makes is in bringing together marginalized communities that are usually analyzed discretely. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. --Jason Arthur Pierceson, University of Illinois at Springfield

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