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Bondarchuk's War and peace : literary classic to Soviet cinematic epic / Denise J. Youngblood.

By: Youngblood, Denise J. (Denise Jeanne), 1952-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700620401; 0700620400; 0700620052; 9780700620050.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bondarchuk's War and peace.DDC classification: 791.43/72 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- From inception to screen -- War and peace as a film epic -- War and peace as an adaptation -- War and peace as history -- Bondarchuk versus Vidor -- Coda: Bondarchuk's Waterloo -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1997.V577 Y88 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1c6v8vx Available ocn896890128

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- From inception to screen -- War and peace as a film epic -- War and peace as an adaptation -- War and peace as history -- Bondarchuk versus Vidor -- Coda: Bondarchuk's Waterloo -- Conclusion.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book is an exercise in classification and historical periodization. Youngblood (history, Univ. of Vermont) traces the production of Bondarchuk's War and Peace (1966) through Khrushchev and into the Brezhnev period, exploring political and cultural correspondences that date back to Stalin (who was an admirer of Bondarchuk). The author's analysis is deeply rooted in the context of the Cold War-the volume can be viewed as an extension of her Cinematic Cold War: The American Struggle for Hearts and Minds (CH, Feb'11, 48-3175), which she co-wrote with Tony Shaw-an approach most evident in a chapter devoted to comparison of Bondarchuk's film and King Vidor's Italian American adaptation of War and Peace (1956). The heart of the book deals with questions of classification of the film both as an epic and as a faithful adaptation. Discussion of the epic is productive, placing the film within Brezhnev-era discourses of monumentalism and Russian nationalism, but the adaptation and history chapters are less successful in that they largely measure the film's value according to fidelity. More interesting is Youngblood's final section on Bondarchuk's Waterloo, an Italian Soviet effort produced by Dino De Laurentiis, who also produced Vidor's War and Peace. Here, Youngblood's research complicates the picture of cinema and politics during the Cold War. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Andrew H Chapman, Dartmouth College

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