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A woman's wartime journal : an account of the passage over Georgia's plantation of Sherman's army on the march to the sea, as recorded in the diary of Dolly Sumner Lunt (Mrs. Thomas Burge) / Dolly Sumner Lunt and Julian Street.

By: Lunt, Dolly Sumner, 1817-1891 [author.].
Contributor(s): Street, Julian, 1879-1947 [writer of added text.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill, NC : The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469607801; 1469607808.Subject(s): Sherman's March to the Sea -- Personal narrativesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 973.7378 LOC classification: E605 | .L86 2014E605Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Dolly Sumner Lunt begins her diary, published in 1918, by recalling her anxiety about the approach of General Sherman's Union army on January 1, 1864. Despite her efforts to hide her valuable possessions, the Union troops raid her house and plantation and take her slaves with them. They also set fire to cotton bales in her barn, but the blaze burns out before spreading. In her last entries, dated December 1865, Lunt writes optimistically about the recovery of her farm, her new sharecropping system, and the first cheerful Christmas in years.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E605 .L86 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469607795_lunt Available ocn897432918

"A DocSouth Books Edition, 2012".

Dolly Sumner Lunt begins her diary, published in 1918, by recalling her anxiety about the approach of General Sherman's Union army on January 1, 1864. Despite her efforts to hide her valuable possessions, the Union troops raid her house and plantation and take her slaves with them. They also set fire to cotton bales in her barn, but the blaze burns out before spreading. In her last entries, dated December 1865, Lunt writes optimistically about the recovery of her farm, her new sharecropping system, and the first cheerful Christmas in years.

Description based on online resource; title from home page (viewed on May 21, 2014).

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