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Growing local : case studies on local food supply chains / edited by Robert P. King, Michael S. Hand, and Miguel I. Gómez.

Contributor(s): King, Robert Philip, 1950- [editor.] | Hand, Michael S. (Michael Stephen), 1977- [editor.] | Gómez, Miguel I [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Our sustainable future: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803256996; 080325699X.Other title: Case studies on local food supply chains.Subject(s): Food supply -- United States -- Case studies | Local foods -- United States -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Growing localDDC classification: 338.1/973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Part 1. Understanding local food systems from a supply chain perspective. From farms to consumers: an introduction to supply chains for local foods / Miguel I. Gómez and Michael S. Hand -- Research design for local food case studies / Robert P. King, Michael S. Hand, and Gigi DiGiacomo -- Part 2: Case studies on local food supply chains. Apple case studies in the Syracuse MSA / Miguel I. Gómez, Edward W. McLaughlin, and Kristen S. Park -- Blueberry case studies in the Portland-Vancouver MSA / Larry Lev -- Spring Mix case studies in the Sacramento MSA / Shermain D. Hardesty -- Beef case studies in the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington MSA / Robert P. King, Gigi DiGiacomo, and Gerald F. Ortmann -- Fluid milk case studies in the Washington D.C. area / Michael S. Hand and Kate Clancy -- Part 3: A synthesis of case study findings. Product prices and availability / Kristen S. Park, Miguel I. Gómez, Gerald F. Ortmann, and Jeffrey Horwich -- What does local deliver? / Larry Lev, Michael S. Hand, and Gigi DiGiacomo -- Can local food markets expand? / Edward W. McLaughlin, Shermain D. Hardesty, and Miguel I. Gómez -- What role do public policies and programs play in the growth of local foods? / Michael S. Hand and Kate Clancy -- A look at the future / Robert P. King, Miguel I. Gómez, and Michael S. Hand.
Summary: In an increasingly commercialized world, the demand for better quality, healthier food has given rise to one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food system: locally grown food. Many believe that 'relocalization' of the food system will provide a range of public benefits, including lower carbon emissions, increased local economic activity, and closer connections between consumers, farmers, and communities. The structure of local food supply chains, however, may not always be capable of generating these perceived benefits. Growing Local reports the findings from a coordinated series of case studies designed to develop a deeper, more nuanced understanding of how local food products reach consumers and how local food supply chains compare with mainstream supermarket supply chains. To better understand how local food reaches the point of sale, Growing Local uses case study methods to rigorously compare local and mainstream supply chains for five products in five metropolitan areas along multiple social, economic, and environmental dimensions, highlighting areas of growth and potential barriers. Growing Local provides a foundation for a better understanding of the characteristics of local food production and emphasizes the realities of operating local food supply chains.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD9005 .G76 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d9nk8d Available ocn897814696

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Part 1. Understanding local food systems from a supply chain perspective. From farms to consumers: an introduction to supply chains for local foods / Miguel I. Gómez and Michael S. Hand -- Research design for local food case studies / Robert P. King, Michael S. Hand, and Gigi DiGiacomo -- Part 2: Case studies on local food supply chains. Apple case studies in the Syracuse MSA / Miguel I. Gómez, Edward W. McLaughlin, and Kristen S. Park -- Blueberry case studies in the Portland-Vancouver MSA / Larry Lev -- Spring Mix case studies in the Sacramento MSA / Shermain D. Hardesty -- Beef case studies in the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington MSA / Robert P. King, Gigi DiGiacomo, and Gerald F. Ortmann -- Fluid milk case studies in the Washington D.C. area / Michael S. Hand and Kate Clancy -- Part 3: A synthesis of case study findings. Product prices and availability / Kristen S. Park, Miguel I. Gómez, Gerald F. Ortmann, and Jeffrey Horwich -- What does local deliver? / Larry Lev, Michael S. Hand, and Gigi DiGiacomo -- Can local food markets expand? / Edward W. McLaughlin, Shermain D. Hardesty, and Miguel I. Gómez -- What role do public policies and programs play in the growth of local foods? / Michael S. Hand and Kate Clancy -- A look at the future / Robert P. King, Miguel I. Gómez, and Michael S. Hand.

In an increasingly commercialized world, the demand for better quality, healthier food has given rise to one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food system: locally grown food. Many believe that 'relocalization' of the food system will provide a range of public benefits, including lower carbon emissions, increased local economic activity, and closer connections between consumers, farmers, and communities. The structure of local food supply chains, however, may not always be capable of generating these perceived benefits. Growing Local reports the findings from a coordinated series of case studies designed to develop a deeper, more nuanced understanding of how local food products reach consumers and how local food supply chains compare with mainstream supermarket supply chains. To better understand how local food reaches the point of sale, Growing Local uses case study methods to rigorously compare local and mainstream supply chains for five products in five metropolitan areas along multiple social, economic, and environmental dimensions, highlighting areas of growth and potential barriers. Growing Local provides a foundation for a better understanding of the characteristics of local food production and emphasizes the realities of operating local food supply chains.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Based on the enticing title, the prospect of learning about the local food movement--including strategies, successes, and failures in the business--would be both interesting and valuable. Instead, the book is a series of case studies painstakingly reported using academic research methodology. Within a few pages, the obvious question this reviewer asked was "Who is the audience for this book?" Three hundred pages do not reveal the answer. Edited by the three authors, each "coordinated" chapter follows the same format: location, product, and three case studies conducted in 2009 describing differences in supply chain structure, size, and performance followed by community linkages, policy, and regulatory issues and ending with cross-case comparisons. In part 3, the authors provide price premium data for local food suppliers that, if current, could be valuable to farmers considering direct marketing. But as the authors state, "Any consideration of what local delivers must begin with the recognition that it provides satisfaction to a certain segment of consumers and citizens. Beyond that, the deliverables are murkier." Agricultural marketing researchers might find this book useful, but farmers, farmer's market managers, and people involved in local food supply chain policy will have to dive deep to find "pearls" worth harvesting. Summing Up: Optional. Researchers and faculty. --Davis Folsom, University South Carolina-Beaufort

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert P. King is a professor of applied economics at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. Michael S. Hand is a research economist with the USDA Forest Service in Missoula, Montana. Miguel I. Gómez is Ruth and William Morgan Assistant Professor in the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University.

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