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The people's right to the novel : war fiction in the postcolony / Eleni Coundouriotis.

By: Coundouriotis, Eleni.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, USA, 2014Description: 1 online resource (xi, 336 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780823262366; 0823262367.Subject(s): African fiction (English) -- History and criticism | African fiction (French) -- History and criticism | War in literature | Literature and society -- AfricaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: People's right to the novel.DDC classification: 823 LOC classification: PR9344 | .C68 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Naturalism, humanitarianism, and the fiction of war -- 1. "No innocents and no onlookers" : the uses of the past in the novels of Mau Mau -- 2. Toward a people's history : the novels of the Nigerian Civil War -- 3. "Wondering who the heroes were" : Zimbabwe's novels of atrocity -- 4. Contesting the new authenticity : contemporary war fiction in Africa -- Afterword.
Summary: "The ambition of this study is shaped by two somewhat contradictory impulses. The first is to use the novel of war in Africa as a case study to say something broader and bigger about the war novel as a genre across literary traditions and reaching backwards and forwards in history. The second is to deepen our understanding of the novel in Africa by doing a literary history of the genre of the war novel that has been overlooked in relation to the more widely read and canonized Bildungsroman form. Pulling in two different directions, one towards a more global context, and the other inwards, to the specificities of a particular tradition, this book, moreover, stresses the convergence of two sensibilities: the naturalist aesthetic and a humanitarian ethos which takes up the responsibility for the suffering of others. Both these sensibilities are present in culturally hybrid forms in the African war novel, reflecting its syncretism as a narrative practice engaged with the colonial and postcolonial history of the continent. The narration of war broadly evokes some form of these two sensibilities of naturalism and humanitarianism, gesturing towards a universal statement about the experience of war. This study offers a literary history of the war novel in Africa and argues for the genre's distinct contribution to the literary culture of the continent while arguing that the war novel is a form of people's history that participates in a political struggle for the rights of the dispossessed"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR9344 .C68 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x02jt Available ocn898120691

"The ambition of this study is shaped by two somewhat contradictory impulses. The first is to use the novel of war in Africa as a case study to say something broader and bigger about the war novel as a genre across literary traditions and reaching backwards and forwards in history. The second is to deepen our understanding of the novel in Africa by doing a literary history of the genre of the war novel that has been overlooked in relation to the more widely read and canonized Bildungsroman form. Pulling in two different directions, one towards a more global context, and the other inwards, to the specificities of a particular tradition, this book, moreover, stresses the convergence of two sensibilities: the naturalist aesthetic and a humanitarian ethos which takes up the responsibility for the suffering of others. Both these sensibilities are present in culturally hybrid forms in the African war novel, reflecting its syncretism as a narrative practice engaged with the colonial and postcolonial history of the continent. The narration of war broadly evokes some form of these two sensibilities of naturalism and humanitarianism, gesturing towards a universal statement about the experience of war. This study offers a literary history of the war novel in Africa and argues for the genre's distinct contribution to the literary culture of the continent while arguing that the war novel is a form of people's history that participates in a political struggle for the rights of the dispossessed"-- Provided by publisher.

Introduction: Naturalism, humanitarianism, and the fiction of war -- 1. "No innocents and no onlookers" : the uses of the past in the novels of Mau Mau -- 2. Toward a people's history : the novels of the Nigerian Civil War -- 3. "Wondering who the heroes were" : Zimbabwe's novels of atrocity -- 4. Contesting the new authenticity : contemporary war fiction in Africa -- Afterword.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

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