Roads taken : the great Jewish migrations to the new world and the peddlers who forged the way / Hasia Diner.

By: Diner, Hasia R [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300210194; 0300210191Subject(s): Jews -- Economic conditions -- History | Jewish peddlers -- History | Jewish businesspeople -- History | Jews -- Migrations -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Roads takenDDC classification: 381/.108992407 LOC classification: DS140 | .D56 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Road warriors: the migration and the peddlers -- Road runners: Jewish peddlers in their new worlds -- Along the road: Jewish peddlers and their new-world customers -- Road rage: Jewish peddlers and the perils of the road -- The end of the road: life after peddling -- Legacies of the road: a conclusion.
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DS140 .D56 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x1tpz Available ocn898893380

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Road warriors: the migration and the peddlers -- Road runners: Jewish peddlers in their new worlds -- Along the road: Jewish peddlers and their new-world customers -- Road rage: Jewish peddlers and the perils of the road -- The end of the road: life after peddling -- Legacies of the road: a conclusion.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Painting on a grand canvas, Diner's vivid portrait of Jewish peddling depicts how a humble occupation shared by generations of Jewish immigrants from a variety of backgrounds acted as an engine of opportunity and transformation in the New World. Diner (NYU) nimbly plucks examples from across three centuries and five continents to demonstrate how the processes that drew Jews to new lands and integrated them into new societies were intimately intertwined with peddling. Itinerant commerce, Diner argues, was transformative for both the tradesman (rural peddlers were almost uniformly men) and his customers. In crossing the threshold of his customers' homes, the peddler sped his own adaptation to his new environment, connected remote homesteads to a larger capitalist economy, and rendered his own ethnic identity less exotic in the eyes of the farmers whose hospitality he enjoyed. Even as Diner emphasizes how this occupation enabled Jews to cross boundaries in racially and religiously divided societies, she does not downplay the hardships and perils of peddling. This fleet-footed tour of an occupation central to modern Jewish history supplies readers with enough insights and anecdotes to excite even the most jaded customer. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Alll levels/libraries. --Adam D Mendelsohn, College of Charleston

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Hasia R. Diner is the Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judiac Studies at New York University. She has taught American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Johns Hopkins.

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