Ground zero, Nagasaki : stories / Seirai Yūichi ; translated by Paul Warham.

By: Seirai, Yūichi [author.]Contributor(s): Warham, Paul [translator.] | Seirai, Yūichi. Bukushin. EnglishMaterial type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: Japanese Series: Weatherhead books on Asia: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231538565; 0231538561; 9781322489698; 1322489696Uniform titles: Short stories. Selections. English Subject(s): Atomic bomb victims -- Japan -- Nagasaki-ken -- FictionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ground zero, Nagasaki.DDC classification: 895.63/6 LOC classification: PL861.E345 | B3513 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Nails -- Stone -- Insects -- Honey -- Shells -- Birds.
Summary: "Set in contemporary Nagasaki, the six short stories in this collection draw a chilling portrait of the ongoing trauma of the detonation of the atomic bomb. Whether they experienced the destruction of the city directly or heard about it from survivors, the characters in these tales filter their pain and alienation through their Catholic faith, illuminating a side of Japanese culture little known in the West. Many of them are descended from the 'hidden Christians' who continued to practice their religion in secret during the centuries when it was outlawed in Japan. Urakami Cathedral, the center of Japanese Christian life, stood at ground zero when the bomb fell. In 'Birds, ' a man in his sixties reflects on his life as a husband and father. Just a baby when he was found crying in the rubble near ground zero, he does not know who his parents were. His birthday is set as the day the bomb was dropped. In other stories, a woman is haunted by her brief affair with a married man, and the parents of a schizophrenic man struggle to come to terms with the murder their son committed. These characters battle with guilt, shame, loss, love, and the limits of human understanding. Ground Zero, Nagasaki vividly depicts a city and people still scarred by the memory of August 9, 1945"--Provided by publisher.
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PL861.E345 B3513 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/seir17116 Available ocn902416401

Original title Bakushin.

Translated from the Japanese.

Nails -- Stone -- Insects -- Honey -- Shells -- Birds.

"Set in contemporary Nagasaki, the six short stories in this collection draw a chilling portrait of the ongoing trauma of the detonation of the atomic bomb. Whether they experienced the destruction of the city directly or heard about it from survivors, the characters in these tales filter their pain and alienation through their Catholic faith, illuminating a side of Japanese culture little known in the West. Many of them are descended from the 'hidden Christians' who continued to practice their religion in secret during the centuries when it was outlawed in Japan. Urakami Cathedral, the center of Japanese Christian life, stood at ground zero when the bomb fell. In 'Birds, ' a man in his sixties reflects on his life as a husband and father. Just a baby when he was found crying in the rubble near ground zero, he does not know who his parents were. His birthday is set as the day the bomb was dropped. In other stories, a woman is haunted by her brief affair with a married man, and the parents of a schizophrenic man struggle to come to terms with the murder their son committed. These characters battle with guilt, shame, loss, love, and the limits of human understanding. Ground Zero, Nagasaki vividly depicts a city and people still scarred by the memory of August 9, 1945"--Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Seirai Yuichi is a novelist from Nagasaki. He is the author of Jeronimo no jujika (Geronimo's Cross), which won the Bungakukai Prize for New Writers. He also won the Akutagawa Prize for Seisui (Holy Water) and the Ito Sei Literary Prize and the Tanizaki Jun'ichiro Prize for Bakushin (Ground Zero, Nagasaki).Paul Warham is a translator who lives in Tokyo. His translations include Kenzo Kitakata's The Cage, Satoshi Azuchi's Supermarket, and Kazushi Hosaka's Plainsong.

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