Black woman reformer : Ida B. Wells, lynching, and transatlantic activism / Sarah L. Silkey.

By: Silkey, Sarah LMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Athens, GA : The University of Georgia Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820346922; 0820346926Other title: Ida B. Wells, lynching, and transatlantic activismSubject(s): African American women -- Biography | African American women civil rights workers -- Biography | African American women social reformers -- Biography | Lynching -- United States -- Foreign public opinion, British | Civil rights workers -- United States -- Biography | Social reformers -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Black woman reformerDDC classification: 323.092 LOC classification: E185.97.W55 | S55 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
British responses to American lynching -- The emergence of a transatlantic reformer -- The struggle for legitimacy -- Building a transatlantic debate on lynching -- American responses to British protest -- A transatlantic legacy.
Subject: During the early 1890s, a series of shocking lynchings brought unprecedented international attentionto racially motivated American mob violence. This interest created an opportunity for Ida B. Wells, an African American journalist and civil rights activist from Memphis, to travel to England to cultivate British moral indignation against American lynching. Wells adapted race and gender roles established by African American abolitionists in Britain to legitimate her activism as a "black lady reformer"--A role American society denied her - and to assert her right to defend her race from abroad. Black Woman Reformer by Sarah Silkey explores Wells's 1893-94 antilynching campaigns within the broader contexts of nineteenth-century transatlantic reform networks and debates about the role of extralegal violence in American society. Through her speaking engagements, newspaper interviews, and the efforts of her British allies, Wells altered the framework of public debates of lynching in both Britain and the United States. As British criticism of lynching mounted, southern political leaders desperate to maintain positive relations with choose weather to publicly defend or decry lynching. Although British moral pressure and media attention did not end lynching, the international scrutiny generated by Well's campaigns transformed our understanding of racial violence and made American communities increasingly reluctant to embrace lynching-- Dust jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

British responses to American lynching -- The emergence of a transatlantic reformer -- The struggle for legitimacy -- Building a transatlantic debate on lynching -- American responses to British protest -- A transatlantic legacy.

Print version record.

During the early 1890s, a series of shocking lynchings brought unprecedented international attentionto racially motivated American mob violence. This interest created an opportunity for Ida B. Wells, an African American journalist and civil rights activist from Memphis, to travel to England to cultivate British moral indignation against American lynching. Wells adapted race and gender roles established by African American abolitionists in Britain to legitimate her activism as a "black lady reformer"--A role American society denied her - and to assert her right to defend her race from abroad. Black Woman Reformer by Sarah Silkey explores Wells's 1893-94 antilynching campaigns within the broader contexts of nineteenth-century transatlantic reform networks and debates about the role of extralegal violence in American society. Through her speaking engagements, newspaper interviews, and the efforts of her British allies, Wells altered the framework of public debates of lynching in both Britain and the United States. As British criticism of lynching mounted, southern political leaders desperate to maintain positive relations with choose weather to publicly defend or decry lynching. Although British moral pressure and media attention did not end lynching, the international scrutiny generated by Well's campaigns transformed our understanding of racial violence and made American communities increasingly reluctant to embrace lynching-- Dust jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Although the title of this slim volume suggests that it is a biography, in reality, it is much more than that. Using Ida B. Wells, Mississippi-born civil rights activist and anti-lynching crusader, as a central figure, Silkey (Lycoming College) gives readers a compelling understanding of Wells's anti-lynching campaigns, including her two tours of England in the 1890s, which provides an understanding of the persuasive context on lynching as presented to British reformers. Although the focus is on anti-lynching, the author also offers insight into issues of gender in reform efforts of the late 19th century, as well as evidence of the important transatlantic nature of such efforts. Further, through a look at the southern response to Wells's anti-lynching campaigns, Silkey illuminates a very important dimension of the emergence of the New South--namely, that without attention to race-related civil rights issues, southern businessmen risked their access to capital and trade. Based on several manuscript collections in both US and British libraries, numerous newspapers from African American and white presses, and a wide-ranging secondary literature, the volume is a welcome addition to the literature. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, professionals. --Thomas F. Armstrong, formerly, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

Author notes provided by Syndetics

SARAH L. SILKEY is an assistant professor of history at Lycoming College.

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