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Natchez Country : Indians, colonists, and the landscapes of race in French Louisiana / George Edward Milne.

By: Milne, George Edward.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Early American places.Publisher: Athens, Georgia : The University of Georgia Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820347516; 0820347515.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Mississippi River Valley -- History | Slavery -- Colonies -- France -- History | French -- Louisiana -- History | Natchez Indians -- Ethnic identity | Natchez Indians -- First contact with EuropeansAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Natchez Country : Indians, colonists, and the landscapes of race in French Louisiana.DDC classification: 323.1197/9 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- Rising suns -- Thefts of the suns -- Impudent immigrants -- The many lands of Natchez Country -- "These are people who named themselves red men" -- Fallen forts -- Legacies.
Summary: "This manuscript focuses on the interactions between Native Americans and European colonists during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, particularly the relationships that developed between the French and the Natchez, Chickasaw, and Choctaw peoples. Milne's history of the Lower Mississippi Valley and its peoples provides the most comprehensive and detailed account of the Natchez in particular, from La Salle's first encounter with what would become Louisiana to the ultimate disappearance of the Natchez by the end of the 1730s. In crafting this narrative, George Milne also analyzes the ways in which French attitudes about race and slavery influenced native North American Indians in the vicinity of French colonial settlements on the Gulf coast, and how in turn Native Americans adopted and/or resisted colonial ideology"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "At the dawn of the 1700s the Natchez viewed the first Francophones in the Lower Mississippi Valley as potential inductees to their chiefdom. This mistaken perception lulled them into permitting these outsiders to settle among them. Within two decades conditions in Natchez Country had taken a turn for the worse. The trickle of wayfarers had given way to a torrent of colonists (and their enslaved Africans) who refused to recognize the Natchez's hierarchy. These newcomers threatened to seize key authority-generating features of Natchez Country: mounds, a plaza, and a temple. This threat inspired these Indians to turn to a recent import--racial categories--to reestablish social order. They began to call themselves 'red men' to reunite their polity and to distance themselves from the 'blacks' and 'whites' into which their neighbors divided themselves. After refashioning their identity, they launched an attack that destroyed the nearby colonial settlements. Their 1729 assault began a two-year war that resulted in the death or enslavement of most of the Natchez people. In Natchez Country, George Edward Milne provides the most comprehensive history of the Lower Mississippi Valley and the Natchez to date. From La Salle's first encounter with what would become Louisiana to the ultimate dispersal of the Natchez by the close of the 1730s, Milne also analyzes the ways in which French attitudes about race and slavery influenced native North American Indians in the vicinity of French colonial settlements on the Mississippi River and how Native Americans in turn adopted and resisted colonial ideology"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E99.N2 M55 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt17574v0 Available ocn904033585

Introduction -- Rising suns -- Thefts of the suns -- Impudent immigrants -- The many lands of Natchez Country -- "These are people who named themselves red men" -- Fallen forts -- Legacies.

"This manuscript focuses on the interactions between Native Americans and European colonists during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, particularly the relationships that developed between the French and the Natchez, Chickasaw, and Choctaw peoples. Milne's history of the Lower Mississippi Valley and its peoples provides the most comprehensive and detailed account of the Natchez in particular, from La Salle's first encounter with what would become Louisiana to the ultimate disappearance of the Natchez by the end of the 1730s. In crafting this narrative, George Milne also analyzes the ways in which French attitudes about race and slavery influenced native North American Indians in the vicinity of French colonial settlements on the Gulf coast, and how in turn Native Americans adopted and/or resisted colonial ideology"-- Provided by publisher.

"At the dawn of the 1700s the Natchez viewed the first Francophones in the Lower Mississippi Valley as potential inductees to their chiefdom. This mistaken perception lulled them into permitting these outsiders to settle among them. Within two decades conditions in Natchez Country had taken a turn for the worse. The trickle of wayfarers had given way to a torrent of colonists (and their enslaved Africans) who refused to recognize the Natchez's hierarchy. These newcomers threatened to seize key authority-generating features of Natchez Country: mounds, a plaza, and a temple. This threat inspired these Indians to turn to a recent import--racial categories--to reestablish social order. They began to call themselves 'red men' to reunite their polity and to distance themselves from the 'blacks' and 'whites' into which their neighbors divided themselves. After refashioning their identity, they launched an attack that destroyed the nearby colonial settlements. Their 1729 assault began a two-year war that resulted in the death or enslavement of most of the Natchez people. In Natchez Country, George Edward Milne provides the most comprehensive history of the Lower Mississippi Valley and the Natchez to date. From La Salle's first encounter with what would become Louisiana to the ultimate dispersal of the Natchez by the close of the 1730s, Milne also analyzes the ways in which French attitudes about race and slavery influenced native North American Indians in the vicinity of French colonial settlements on the Mississippi River and how Native Americans in turn adopted and resisted colonial ideology"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Milne (Oakland Univ.) analyzes Natchez behavior after French intrusion into their multicultural, pyramidal chiefdom. Precontact chiefdoms drew power from the sacred mounds of the Grand Village. Natchez leaders tried to incorporate the French and their slaves into their multicultural polity. The French pictured the world differently and injected racial distinctions as determinants into this emergent middle ground. French refusal to incorporate led to Natchez reprisals and French retaliations. French behavior rejected Natchez protocols, so the Natchez realized they would have to adjust to racial terms. By 1725, they were calling themselves and other Indians "Red" men in contrast to the "White" and "Black" others. Soon, Red men became the distinguishing term used by the Choctaw, Cherokee, and Creek. Milne provides a needed description of an evolving chiefdom, the French polity of Louisiana, the emergence of racial designations as a formative concept replacing identity based on sacred mounds, and the destruction of the Natchez as an ethnic group. The author's use of French sources of Natchez history is excellent and the theoretical discussion of sacred place reasonably plausible. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Gregory Omer Gagnon, Loyola University of New Orleans

Author notes provided by Syndetics

GEORGE EDWARD MILNE is associate professor of early American history at Oakland University.

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