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Sea of opportunity : the Japanese pioneers of the fishing industry in Hawaiʻi / Manako Ogawa.

By: Ogawa, Manako [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Honolulu : University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780824854850; 0824854853.Subject(s): Fisheries -- Hawaii -- History | Fishing -- Hawaii -- History | Fishers -- Hawaii -- History | Japanese -- Employment -- Hawaii -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Sea of opportunity.DDC classification: 338.3/72709969 LOC classification: DU624.7.J3 | O373 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Passage to Hawaiʻi: the development of a fishing culture in Japan since ancient times -- Japanese fisherman enter Hawaiian waters: the formative years of commercial fishing in Hawaiʻi and the rise of the Japanese, from 1899 to the early 1920s -- The heyday of the Japanese fishing industry in Hawaiʻi -- Surviving the dark days -- The reconstruction and revitalization of fisheries after World War II -- Okinawa and Hawaiʻi.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DU624.7.J3 O373 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x1hzr Available ocn905734266

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Passage to Hawaiʻi: the development of a fishing culture in Japan since ancient times -- Japanese fisherman enter Hawaiian waters: the formative years of commercial fishing in Hawaiʻi and the rise of the Japanese, from 1899 to the early 1920s -- The heyday of the Japanese fishing industry in Hawaiʻi -- Surviving the dark days -- The reconstruction and revitalization of fisheries after World War II -- Okinawa and Hawaiʻi.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Ogawa (Ritsumeikan Univ., Kyoto) examines how Japanese fishermen and women became the leaders of the Hawaiian fishing industry during the 20th century. This story begins in the fishing communities of Japan during the 19th century and ends in post-WW II Hawai'i. Most notably, the author explains how Japanese immigrants came to Hawai'i as fishers, not just as plantation workers. In addition, she provides information regarding interracial and interethnic relations among Chinese, Japanese, and Native Hawaiians. Finally, Ogawa argues that some Japanese fishers were able to reestablish their prominence in the Hawaiian fishing industry even after being interned during WW II. One minor shortcoming is that Ogawa simply refers to Hawaiian and Japanese fishing conflicts as a "clash of different fishing cultures." For Hawaiians, overfishing was about more than cultural conflict; it was another example of how they were losing sovereignty in the protection of their 'ina (land and sea) as a result of Western imperialism and the fall of the Hawaiian monarchy. This study contributes to other studies on Japanese in the Pacific Islands, such as David Hanlon's Making Micronesia: A Political Biography of Tosiwo Nakayama (2014). Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Alfred Peredo Flores, University of California, Los Angeles

Author notes provided by Syndetics

OgawaManako:<br> <p> Manako Ogawa is associate professor of Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan.</p>

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