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Writing reconstruction : race, gender, and citizenship in the postwar south / Sharon D. Kennedy-Nolle.

By: Kennedy-Nolle, Sharon D [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Gender and American culture.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469621098; 1469621096; 1469621088; 9781469621081.Subject(s): Gender identity in literature | Race awareness in literature | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Writing reconstruction.DDC classification: 810.9/975 LOC classification: PS261 | .K38 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Owning up to citizenship -- Constance Fenimore Woolson and the tourist outback of Florida -- Sewing on the badges of servitude: Albion Tourge V. North Carolina -- A divided river town: African American education, Storer College and the pioneer press of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia -- George washington Cable and the wages of ventriloquized peformance in New Orleans, Louisiana -- Iowa's American gothic in Arkansas: the plantation fiction of octave thanet -- Conclusion: The stange career of reconstruction writing.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS261 .K38 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469621081_kennedy-nolle Available ocn906005984

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Owning up to citizenship -- Constance Fenimore Woolson and the tourist outback of Florida -- Sewing on the badges of servitude: Albion Tourge V. North Carolina -- A divided river town: African American education, Storer College and the pioneer press of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia -- George washington Cable and the wages of ventriloquized peformance in New Orleans, Louisiana -- Iowa's American gothic in Arkansas: the plantation fiction of octave thanet -- Conclusion: The stange career of reconstruction writing.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kennedy-Nolle (Samuel Rudin Academic Resource Center, Iona College) offers a fascinating and original reading of the popular literature produced during Reconstruction. She looks at this literature through the lens of the five military districts that divided the postwar South; for each district she selects a central figure--George Washington Cable, Albion Tourgée, Constance Fenimore Woolson, Octave Thanet, and activist students from the historically black Stoker College--exploring how districting influenced and was influenced by literary production. For instance, she argues that Woolson's travel sketches serve to highlight the role of non-white Floridans in transforming Military District Three into a tourist destination, simultaneously renovating the meaning of work to highlight the independence and dignity of laborers. For this reviewer the most compelling chapters are those on the freed people's Stoker College, in Military District One, and Thanet's novel Expiation (1890). In contrast to voices like W. E. B. Du Bois, these writers tended to embrace Reconstruction's promise for African Americans, reconceptualizing the role of women--both at home and in the marketplace--even as their work confronts the limitations and contradictions of their own visions. This is a significant contribution to the scholarship on the literature of the Civil War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Laura E. von Wallmenich, Alma College

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