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Death and other penalties : philosophy in a time of mass incarceration / edited by Geoffrey Adelsberg, Lisa Guenther, and Scott Zeman.

Contributor(s): Adelsberg, Geoffrey [editor.] | Guenther, Lisa, 1971- [editor.] | Zeman, Scott C [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York, NY : Fordham University Press, 2015Edition: First edition.Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780823265329; 0823265323; 9780823265336; 0823265331.Subject(s): Capital punishment -- United States | Imprisonment -- United States | Punishment -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Death and other penalties.DDC classification: 365/.973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Mass incarceration is one of the most pressing ethical and political issues of our time. In this volume, philosophers join activists and those incarcerated on death row to grapple with contemporary U.S. punishment practices and draw out critiques around questions of power, identity, justice, and ethical responsibility. This work takes shape against a backdrop of disturbing trends: The United States incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other country in the world. A disproportionate number of these prisoners are people of color, and, today, a black man has a greater chance of going to.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV8699.U5 D337 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt14jxrhw Available ocn906575799

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Mass incarceration is one of the most pressing ethical and political issues of our time. In this volume, philosophers join activists and those incarcerated on death row to grapple with contemporary U.S. punishment practices and draw out critiques around questions of power, identity, justice, and ethical responsibility. This work takes shape against a backdrop of disturbing trends: The United States incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other country in the world. A disproportionate number of these prisoners are people of color, and, today, a black man has a greater chance of going to.

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