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Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery : William and Ellen Craft in Cultural Memory.

By: McCaskill, Barbara.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.A Sarah Mills Hodge Fund Publication: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (149 p.).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820348322; 0820348325.Subject(s): Abolitionists -- United States -- Biography | Racially mixed women -- United States -- Biography | Spouses -- United States -- Biography | African Americans -- United States -- Biography | Slaves -- Georgia -- Biography | Fugitive slaves -- England -- Biography | Fugitive slaves -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery : William and Ellen Craft in Cultural MemoryDDC classification: 306.3620922 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction. The Crafts and the Memory of Slavery; One. The "Thrilling" Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Georgia; Two. Boston's Glorious Fugitives; Three. Running a Thousand Miles in England; Four. The Boston Libel Trial of William Craft; Epilogue. A Story to Pass Down; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: The spectacular 1848 escape of William and Ellen Craft (1824-1900; 1826-1891) from slavery in Macon, Georgia, is a dramatic story in the annals of American history. Ellen, who could pass for white, disguised herself as a gentleman slaveholder; William accompanied her as his "master's" devoted slave valet; both traveled openly by train, steamship, and carriage to arrive in free Philadelphia on Christmas Day. In Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery , Barbara McCaskill revisits this dual escape and examines the collaborations and partnerships that characterized the Crafts' activism for the next.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E450 .M129 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt17574x1 Available ocn910446876

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction. The Crafts and the Memory of Slavery; One. The "Thrilling" Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Georgia; Two. Boston's Glorious Fugitives; Three. Running a Thousand Miles in England; Four. The Boston Libel Trial of William Craft; Epilogue. A Story to Pass Down; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

The spectacular 1848 escape of William and Ellen Craft (1824-1900; 1826-1891) from slavery in Macon, Georgia, is a dramatic story in the annals of American history. Ellen, who could pass for white, disguised herself as a gentleman slaveholder; William accompanied her as his "master's" devoted slave valet; both traveled openly by train, steamship, and carriage to arrive in free Philadelphia on Christmas Day. In Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery , Barbara McCaskill revisits this dual escape and examines the collaborations and partnerships that characterized the Crafts' activism for the next.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The historical exploration and interpretation of American slave narratives has enjoyed a recent, long renaissance. Having moved far beyond Frederick Douglass, today's scholar is conversant in the myriad voices of the enslaved. McCaskill (English, Univ. of Georgia) enters the discussion through William and Ellen Craft. The Crafts fled slavery in 1848, and their narrative, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, appeared in 1860. Geared toward experts, McCaskill's book documents love, liberation, and escape, themes that run through "four extraordinary moments of the Crafts' public lives" from 1848 to the post-Civil War era. Built on archival and newspaper research, the arguments here also wind through the secondary literature on slave narratives. What is missing is a fuller discussion of writing and freedom--how the act of writing, an avenue recently opened by Christopher Hager in his Word by Word (CH, Aug'13, 50-6622), defined and shaped the Crafts' understanding of their liberation. One wonders too how the Crafts' story, which highlights the escape of a married couple, compares to other similar tales, such as the 1842 escape of George and Rebecca Latimer. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. --Scott Gac, Trinity College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

BARBARA McCASKILL is a professor of English at the University of Georgia, and co-director of the Civil Rights Digital Library Initiative. She is the author of Post-Bellum, Pre-Harlem: African American Literature and Culture, 1877-1919 (New York University Press, 2006), Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery: William and Ellen Craft in Cultural Memory (Georgia, 2015), and a teaching edition of the 1860 memoir Running 1,000 Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (University of Georgia Press, 1999).

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