Free labor : the Civil War and the making of an American working class / Mark A. Lause.

By: Lause, Mark A [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksWorking class in American history: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252097386; 0252097386Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Free Labor : The Civil War and the Making of an American Working ClassDDC classification: 305.5/620973 LOC classification: HD8070Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Prologue: The antebellum labor crisis: organized workers as a force in mid-nineteenth-century American history -- Part I. Labor, liberty, and union -- Workers and the crisis of nationhood: the social republic, peace, and the union -- Continuities of class: the persistence of labor struggles -- Organized labor goes to war: the fate of the old workers' movement -- Part II. Remaking the work force -- The great slave strike: emancipation and race -- The alienation of militancy: immigrants and the new white workingmen -- The survival of moral suasion: gender, sisterhood, and paternalism -- Part II. War, revolution, and labor -- New militancy across the union: the strike waves and labor movements of 1863 -- Richmond, New Orleans, Nashville: the diverse experience of urban labor in the south -- The state power: workers and the new authorities, north and south -- Part IV. Shaping the postwar order -- The emergence of labor reform: class, citizenship, and politics -- Toward a national labor presence: exploring the class limits of respectability -- A peace of sorts: labor, liberty, and respectability -- Epilogue: 1877: reconstructions of class.
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Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Prologue: The antebellum labor crisis: organized workers as a force in mid-nineteenth-century American history -- Part I. Labor, liberty, and union -- Workers and the crisis of nationhood: the social republic, peace, and the union -- Continuities of class: the persistence of labor struggles -- Organized labor goes to war: the fate of the old workers' movement -- Part II. Remaking the work force -- The great slave strike: emancipation and race -- The alienation of militancy: immigrants and the new white workingmen -- The survival of moral suasion: gender, sisterhood, and paternalism -- Part II. War, revolution, and labor -- New militancy across the union: the strike waves and labor movements of 1863 -- Richmond, New Orleans, Nashville: the diverse experience of urban labor in the south -- The state power: workers and the new authorities, north and south -- Part IV. Shaping the postwar order -- The emergence of labor reform: class, citizenship, and politics -- Toward a national labor presence: exploring the class limits of respectability -- A peace of sorts: labor, liberty, and respectability -- Epilogue: 1877: reconstructions of class.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Lause (Univ. of Cincinnati) significantly helps expand knowledge of the US labor movement in the period up to, during, and immediately after the Civil War. Employing a somewhat choppy patchwork approach (due primarily to the limits of sourcing early labor history), Lause nonetheless stitches together an impressive history through massive reading in contemporary and modern printed sources (quite reasonably leaving archival research to future scholars). He uncovers evidence of a healthy antebellum labor movement (although one largely restricted to skilled northern white males, especially strong among printers), at first highly disrupted by the Civil War (due to sectional conflicts within unions and the enlistment/drafting of many unionists) but recovering quickly enough to foster genuine strike waves in some regions (especially New York and Boston) by 1863. Lause terms the massive "self-emancipation" of fleeing Southern slaves as the largest general strike in US history. He argues that by the end of the Civil War, especially because of the brutal repression of the massive 1877 railroad strikes, labor's US future as an essentially conservative, reformist enterprise had been definitively shaped, although his argument on this point is highly sketchy and unconvincing. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Robert J. Goldstein, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mark A. Lause is a professor of American history at the University of Cincinnati. He is the author of A Secret Society History of the Civil War and Young America: Land, Labor, and the Republican Community .

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