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Prison and social death / Joshua M. Price.

By: Price, Joshua M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Critical issues in crime and society: Publisher: New Brunswick, New Jersey : Rutgers University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813565590; 0813565596.Subject(s): Imprisonment -- United States | Prisoners -- United States -- Social conditions | Prisoners -- Deinstitutionalization -- United States | Social isolation -- United States | Marginality, Social -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Prison and social deathDDC classification: 365/.6 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Elements of social death. Crossing the abyss : the study of social death ; Natal alienation ; Humiliation -- Method and a history of social death. Dissemblance and creativity : toward a methodology for studying state violence ; Racism, prison, and the legacies of slavery ; The birth of the penitentiary -- Abolition democracy. "Doesn't everyone know someone in prison or on parole?" ; Spirit murder : reentry, disposession , and enduring stigma ; States of grace : social life against social death ; Conclusion : failure and abolition democracy.
Summary: The United States imprisons more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. To be sentenced to prison is to face systematic violence, humiliation, and, perhaps worst of all, separation from family and community. It is, to borrow Orlando Patterson's term, to suffer "social death." In Prison and Social Death, Joshua Price exposes the unexamined cost that prisoners pay while incarcerated and after release, drawing upon hundreds of often harrowing interviews conducted with people in prison, people on parole, and their families. Price argues that the prison separates incarcerated people from desperately needed communities of support and that this isolation of people in prison renders them highly vulnerable to other forms of violence, including sexual violence. Price stresses that the violence they face also involves institutional forms of mistreatment, ranging from abysmally poor health care to routine practices that are arguably abusive. And social death does not end with prison. The condition is permanent, following people after they are released from prison.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9471 .P75 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt15jjc08 Available ocn910878855

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Elements of social death. Crossing the abyss : the study of social death ; Natal alienation ; Humiliation -- Method and a history of social death. Dissemblance and creativity : toward a methodology for studying state violence ; Racism, prison, and the legacies of slavery ; The birth of the penitentiary -- Abolition democracy. "Doesn't everyone know someone in prison or on parole?" ; Spirit murder : reentry, disposession , and enduring stigma ; States of grace : social life against social death ; Conclusion : failure and abolition democracy.

The United States imprisons more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. To be sentenced to prison is to face systematic violence, humiliation, and, perhaps worst of all, separation from family and community. It is, to borrow Orlando Patterson's term, to suffer "social death." In Prison and Social Death, Joshua Price exposes the unexamined cost that prisoners pay while incarcerated and after release, drawing upon hundreds of often harrowing interviews conducted with people in prison, people on parole, and their families. Price argues that the prison separates incarcerated people from desperately needed communities of support and that this isolation of people in prison renders them highly vulnerable to other forms of violence, including sexual violence. Price stresses that the violence they face also involves institutional forms of mistreatment, ranging from abysmally poor health care to routine practices that are arguably abusive. And social death does not end with prison. The condition is permanent, following people after they are released from prison.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Are persons--male or female--sentenced to a prison term really sentenced to "death"? Sociologist Price (SUNY, Binghamton), writing not about the death penalty but mostly about women sentenced to an upstate New York county jail, believes so. In this little activist-oriented book, Price takes the abolitionist perspective that women incarcerated in New York prisons (making no distinctions between county jails and state prisons) are subject to inhumane indignities that in some ways impact negatively on their personal health. The book has ten chapters organized into three parts: "Elements of Social Death," "Method and a History of Social Death," and "Abolition Democracy." The term social death means humiliation and lasting stigma for those who are incarcerated, even after they are released. Overall, this is an eye-opening account of one county prison system and how it operates to take away liberties of those incarcerated and obstruct the same liberties after release. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students in sociology and criminology; criminal justice professionals. --Earl Smith, Wake Forest University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

JOSHUA M. PRICE is an associate professor of sociology at SUNY-Binghamton and the author of Structural Violence: Hidden Brutality in the Lives of Women . He is the director of the Broome County Jail Health Project, based in upstate New York.

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