Chica lit : popular Latina fiction and Americanization in the twenty-first century / Tace Hedrick.

By: Hedrick, Tace, 1954- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksLatino and Latin American profiles: Publisher: Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822980995; 0822980991Subject(s): Latin American literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Ethnicity in literature | AmericanizationDDC classification: 860.99287098 LOC classification: PQ7081.5Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface : what's a girl to do when...? -- Introduction : a regular American life -- Genre and the romance industry -- Class and taste : is it the poverty? -- Latinization and authenticity -- Conclusion : not even the Mexicans.
Summary: In Chica Lit: Popular Latina Fiction and Americanization in the Twenty-First Century, Tace Hedrick illuminates how discourses of Americanization, ethnicity, gender, class, and commodification shape the genre of "chica lit," popular fiction written by Latina authors with Latina characters. She argues that chica lit is produced and marketed in the same ways as contemporary romance and chick lit fiction, and aimed at an audience of twenty- to thirty-something upwardly mobile Latina readers. Its stories about young women's ethnic class mobility and gendered romantic success tend to celebrate twenty-first century neoliberal narratives about Americanization, hard work, and individual success. However, Hedrick emphasizes, its focus on Latina characters necessarily inflects this celebratory mode: the elusiveness of meaning in its use of the very term "Latina" empties out the differences among and between Latina/o and Chicano/a groups in the United States. Of necessity, chica lit also struggles with questions about the actual social and economic "place" of Latinas and Chicanas in this same neoliberal landscape; these questions unsettle its reliance on the tried-and-true formulas of chick lit and romance writing. Looking at chica lit's market-driven representations of difference, poverty, and Americanization, Hedrick shows how this writing functions within the larger arena of struggles over popular representation of Latinas and Chicanas.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PQ7081.5 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt15nmjb0 Available ocn911200785

Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed June 22, 2015)

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Preface : what's a girl to do when...? -- Introduction : a regular American life -- Genre and the romance industry -- Class and taste : is it the poverty? -- Latinization and authenticity -- Conclusion : not even the Mexicans.

In Chica Lit: Popular Latina Fiction and Americanization in the Twenty-First Century, Tace Hedrick illuminates how discourses of Americanization, ethnicity, gender, class, and commodification shape the genre of "chica lit," popular fiction written by Latina authors with Latina characters. She argues that chica lit is produced and marketed in the same ways as contemporary romance and chick lit fiction, and aimed at an audience of twenty- to thirty-something upwardly mobile Latina readers. Its stories about young women's ethnic class mobility and gendered romantic success tend to celebrate twenty-first century neoliberal narratives about Americanization, hard work, and individual success. However, Hedrick emphasizes, its focus on Latina characters necessarily inflects this celebratory mode: the elusiveness of meaning in its use of the very term "Latina" empties out the differences among and between Latina/o and Chicano/a groups in the United States. Of necessity, chica lit also struggles with questions about the actual social and economic "place" of Latinas and Chicanas in this same neoliberal landscape; these questions unsettle its reliance on the tried-and-true formulas of chick lit and romance writing. Looking at chica lit's market-driven representations of difference, poverty, and Americanization, Hedrick shows how this writing functions within the larger arena of struggles over popular representation of Latinas and Chicanas.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Chica lit is a wonderful addition to the literature on Latina/o popular culture. Taking an expansive theoretical approach that includes a critique of neoliberalism and the difficult questions of stereotyping and authenticity, Hedrick (Univ. of Florida) explores the production, content, and reception of this subgenre within chicklit called chica lit. Given that chica lit seeks a space in mainstream chicklit, the author explores the opportunities and challenges of participating in the marketing of difference. Looking at such subjects as denial of structural inequality and the tension that authors experience in their efforts to write something original against the publishing industry's expectations of an authentic Latina/o that often borders on offensively prejudiced, Hedrick takes the reader through the construction and evolution of the contemporary romance genre, industrial expectations of ethnic female authors, and the possibilities of subverting structural barriers once one's foot is in the door of this publishing industry. The author includes interviews with many authors, and she also deconstructs plots. The resulting book is a brilliant example of scholarship that explores the difficult yet absolutely necessary effort of being present within the mainstream while maintaining cultural integrity. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates and above. --Angharad N. Valdivia, University of Illinois at Urbana

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tace Hedrick is associate professor of English and women's studies at the University of Florida. She is the author of Mestizo Modernism: Race, Nation, and Identity in Latin American Culture, 1900-1940.

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