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Before Boas : the genesis of ethnography and ethnology in the German Enlightenment / Han F. Vermeulen.

By: Vermeulen, Han F, 1952- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Critical studies in the history of anthropology: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xxiii, 718 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803277403; 0803277407; 9780803277380; 0803277385.Subject(s): Enlightenment -- Germany | Ethnology -- Philosophy | Ethnology -- Europe -- History | Ethnology -- Russia -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Before Boas.DDC classification: 306.0943/09033 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. History and Theory of Anthropology and Ethnology : Introduction -- 2. Theory and Practice : G.W. Leibniz and the Advancement of Science in Russia -- 3. Enlightenment and Pietism : D.G. Messerschmidt and the Early Exploration of Siberia -- 4. Ethnography and Empire : G.F. Müller and the Description of Siberian Peoples -- 5. Anthropology and the Orient : C. Niebuhr and the Danish-German Arabia Expedition -- 6. From the Field to the Study : A.L. Schlözer and the German Invention of Völkerkunde -- 7. Anthropology in the German Enlightenment : Plural Approaches to Human Diversity -- 8. Epilogue: Reception of the German Ethnographic Tradition.
Scope and content: "An extensive study of the emergence of ethnology and ethnography, and how theories in Europe and Russia during the eighteenth century experienced a paradigm shift with the work of Franz Boas starting in 1886"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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GN308.3.G3 V37 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d98c8k Available ocn911492562

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. History and Theory of Anthropology and Ethnology : Introduction -- 2. Theory and Practice : G.W. Leibniz and the Advancement of Science in Russia -- 3. Enlightenment and Pietism : D.G. Messerschmidt and the Early Exploration of Siberia -- 4. Ethnography and Empire : G.F. Müller and the Description of Siberian Peoples -- 5. Anthropology and the Orient : C. Niebuhr and the Danish-German Arabia Expedition -- 6. From the Field to the Study : A.L. Schlözer and the German Invention of Völkerkunde -- 7. Anthropology in the German Enlightenment : Plural Approaches to Human Diversity -- 8. Epilogue: Reception of the German Ethnographic Tradition.

Print version record.

"An extensive study of the emergence of ethnology and ethnography, and how theories in Europe and Russia during the eighteenth century experienced a paradigm shift with the work of Franz Boas starting in 1886"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the US, anthropology includes the biological, linguistic, ethnological, and archaeological aspects of studying human beings in groups. Franz Boas initiated the integration of this holistic American anthropology and disseminated it after 1880. But in the 18th century, ethnology and anthropology developed as separate disciplines during the German Enlightenment. Ethnology was "a science of peoples" devoted to the study of cultural or ethnic diversity; anthropology was "a science of humans" devoted to racial, linguistic, and physical categories and differences. Alongside this distinction was another, between ethnology and ethnography. Ethnology developed as a theorized, comparative study of peoples; ethnography was empirical and descriptive. Both are integral to modern sociocultural anthropology, in which comparison and theory require ethnographic data. Vermeulen (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle, Germany) extricates the intellectual lineages of these separate disciplines from the matrix of Enlightenment thought. Anthropology was the province of naturalists and humanist philosophers and ethnology the province of historians and geographers. A short review cannot do justice to the sophistication of the author's comprehensive and remarkable research, which departs from histories that view the origins of anthropology in classical Greece or Renaissance exploration. For all arts and sciences graduate collections. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate and faculty collections. --Riva Berleant-Schiller, emerita, University of Connecticut

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Han F. Vermeulen is an alumnus of Leiden University, the Netherlands, and a research associate at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle (Saale), Germany.

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