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Grounds of engagement : apartheid-era African American and South African writing / Stephane Robolin.

By: Robolin, Stéphane Pierre Raymond, 1975- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: New Black studies series: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252097584; 0252097580.Subject(s): American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | South African literature (English) -- Black authors -- History and criticism | South African literature -- Black authors -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Grounds of engagement.DDC classification: 820.9/896068 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: imagining a transnational ground -- Race, place, and the geography of exile -- Remapping the (black) nation -- Cultivating correspondences; or, other gestures of belonging -- Constructive engagements.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR9358.2.B57 R63 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt16d68tg Available ocn915111612

Introduction: imagining a transnational ground -- Race, place, and the geography of exile -- Remapping the (black) nation -- Cultivating correspondences; or, other gestures of belonging -- Constructive engagements.

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 207-225) and index.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The double entendre of this book's title signals its focus on both conceptual and literal grounds. As Robolin (Rutgers) writes in the introductory chapter, he "foregrounds the significance of social and physical geography in black South African and African American imaginaries because nowhere is the entanglement of race and space more elemental or pervasive than in these segregated societies." Using what he calls "black transnationalism," which he carefully defines as transnationalism with a "stronger challenge to the category of the nation-state," the author devotes the remaining four chapters to analyzing pairs or groups of writers who entered into literary engagements that were mutually generative and influential: Richard Wright and Peter Abrahams; Keorapetse Kgositsile and his relationship with African American writers during his exile in the US; Bessie Head and her correspondence with Nikki Giovanni, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Michelle Cliff; and Richard Rive, Michelle Cliff, Audre Lorde, and Gwendolyn Brooks and how their early contact impacted their later work. Theory is deftly deployed and never jargon-laden. Based largely on extensive archival research in Africa and America, this fascinating, well-documented study makes a significant contribution to understanding intertextual and transnational interactions of South African and African American writers at a time of crucial struggles against racism in both countries. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Elizabeth R. Baer, Gustavus Adolphus College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stéphane Robolin is an assistant professor of English at Rutgers University.

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