Word warrior : Richard Durham, radio, and freedom / Sonja D. Williams.

By: Williams, Sonja D, 1952-Material type: TextTextSeries: The New Black Studies Series: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, 2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252097980; 025209798X; 0252039874; 9780252039874Subject(s): African American political activists -- Biography | African American journalists -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Word warrior.DDC classification: 818/.5409 LOC classification: PS3507.U855 | Z55 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Remembering -- Rural wanderings -- Chicago -- Radio beckons -- Scripts and scoops -- Rare broadcasts -- Freedom -- Moving on -- Empowerment -- Struggling to fly -- Globetrotting with the greatest -- Black political power -- Epilogue.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS3507.U855 Z55 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt16d68sz Available ocn915152208

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Remembering -- Rural wanderings -- Chicago -- Radio beckons -- Scripts and scoops -- Rare broadcasts -- Freedom -- Moving on -- Empowerment -- Struggling to fly -- Globetrotting with the greatest -- Black political power -- Epilogue.

Print version record.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this book, Williams (Howard Univ.) rescues a forgotten but important voice in the Civil Rights Movement. Whether Durham (1917-84) was writing poetry, reporting, or creating radio and television scripts, his subjects remained the same: justice for the African American community and the injustice of segregation. Inspired by Langston Hughes and Richard Wright, Durham began his literary career as a poet in the late 1920s. By the mid-1930s, he was a writer for the Illinois Writer's Project, profiling the state's African American community. By the 1940s, he was a reporter for the Chicago Defender, where he focused on the illegality of segregation. The newspaper sponsored a radio series written by Durham, Democracy USA, in which he focused on forgotten historical black heroes. In 1947, he wrote and produced the radio program Here Comes Tomorrow, the first radio drama to highlight an African American family. In the 1960s-70s, he was the editor of Muhammad Speaks, the journal of the Nation of Islam, and wrote co-wrote Muhammad Ali's autobiography, The Greatest: My Story (1975). William details all this in this well-written analytical profile of this important, versatile writer. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. --David O'Donald Cullen, Collin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sonja D. Williams is a professor in the Department of Media, Journalism, and Film at Howard University and the winner of three George Foster Peabody Awards as a radio producer. Her credits include the radio series Wade in the Water: African American Sacred Music Traditions and Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was .

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