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Broken trust : dysfunctional government and constitutional reform / Stephen M. Griffin.

By: Griffin, Stephen M, 1957- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Constitutional thinking.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, [2015]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700621538; 0700621539.Subject(s): Law reform -- United States | Constitutional law -- United States -- Interpretation and constructionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Broken trust.DDC classification: 342.7303 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Is our government dysfunctional? -- Policy disasters and the constitutional order -- From high trust to low trust -- American constitutionalism western-style : trust and direct democracy -- Pathways to constitutional reform.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF4552 .G75 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1c6v931 Available ocn920620163

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Is our government dysfunctional? -- Policy disasters and the constitutional order -- From high trust to low trust -- American constitutionalism western-style : trust and direct democracy -- Pathways to constitutional reform.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Griffin (Tulane Law School) adds to a growing list of scholars offering a diagnosis and prescribing a cure for America's "dysfunctional government" (e.g., Sanford Levinson's Framed: America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance, 2012, and Randy E. Barnett's Restoring the Lost Constitution, CH, Sep'04, 42-0597). Griffin adds three new dimensions to the discussion. First, he asks to what extent the current crises and the recent "policy disasters" are a function of the system of governance as opposed to the political polarization of the electorate or other nonsystemic factors. Second, he argues that "the issue of trust is central to our problem with dysfunctional government." Lastly, he turns to the states and their experience with the popular initiative, and calls for exploration of more "populist" forms of democracy such as the indirect initiative, "deliberation days," suprapolitical agencies, and the like. He argues that there is a vicious cycle: institutions have stopped working and are engendering distrust and disaffection, trust that is critically important for maintaining an effective constitutional order. To break the cycle external forces--populist measures--are necessary. Thoughtful, innovative, and insightful. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. --Peter J. Galie, Canisius College

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