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Homer and the question of strife from Erasmus to Hobbes / Jessica Wolfe.

By: Wolfe, Jessica [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Toronto : University of Toronto Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xv, 607 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781442622678; 1442622679.Subject(s): Homer -- Appreciation | Homer -- Influence | Homer -- Translations | Homer -- Criticism and interpretation | Epic poetry, Greek -- History and criticism | Social conflict in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Homer and the question of strife from Erasmus to Hobbes.DDC classification: 883/.01 LOC classification: PA4037.A2 | .W777 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Homer, Erasmus, and the problem of strife -- The remedy of contraries : Melanchthon, Rabelais, and epic parody -- Spenser, Homer, and the mythography of strife. Part 1 : the concatenation of virtue -- Part 2 : the two faces of Atê -- Chapman's ironic Homer -- The razor's edge : Homer, Milton, and the problem of deliberation. Part 1 : the razor's edge -- Part 2 : moral horizons : Milton's Horai -- Hobbe's Homer and the idols of the Agora -- Epilogue : the Homeric contest from Vico to Arendt.
Summary: Wolfe's transnational and multilingual study is a landmark work in the study of classical reception that has a great deal to offer to anyone examining the literary, political, and intellectual life of early modern Europe.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PA4037.A2 .W777 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt174d20x Available ocn921143472

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Homer, Erasmus, and the problem of strife -- The remedy of contraries : Melanchthon, Rabelais, and epic parody -- Spenser, Homer, and the mythography of strife. Part 1 : the concatenation of virtue -- Part 2 : the two faces of Atê -- Chapman's ironic Homer -- The razor's edge : Homer, Milton, and the problem of deliberation. Part 1 : the razor's edge -- Part 2 : moral horizons : Milton's Horai -- Hobbe's Homer and the idols of the Agora -- Epilogue : the Homeric contest from Vico to Arendt.

Description based on print version record.

Wolfe's transnational and multilingual study is a landmark work in the study of classical reception that has a great deal to offer to anyone examining the literary, political, and intellectual life of early modern Europe.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this rich survey of Homeric reception in the Renaissance, Wolfe (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) concentrates on the interpretation of strife (in Greek, eris). She moves easily through an extraordinary number and variety of sources, from scholarship on Homer and classical Greek authors to the major writers of the 16th and 17th centuries who were indebted to Homer. As Wolfe shows, Homer was seen either as a champion of rivalry and contention or as a stern critic of strife, and how he was viewed depended on political and cultural circumstances. For example, in chapter 1 Wolfe observes that even though Erasmus "periodically voices his contempt for Achilles and other 'raging bandits' of classical antiquity, his heavy reliance on Homeric allusions in the Adages reflects his appreciation of the special applicability of Homer's wisdom to the resolution of contemporary disputes and conflicts." Of Hobbes, she notes that he translates Homer's strife as "'quarrel,' a word that evokes Lucianic parodies of epic combat as well as the anti-heroic world of Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida." The book will appeal to students of classical reception generally and to Renaissance scholars in particular. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Pura Nieto, Brown University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

WolfeJessica:<br> <p>Jessica Wolfe is a professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.</p>

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