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The ethical dimension of the Decameron / Marilyn Migiel.

By: Migiel, Marilyn, 1954- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Toronto Italian studies: Publisher: Toronto ; Buffalo ; London : University of Toronto Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781442625754; 1442625759.Subject(s): Ethics in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ethical dimension of the DecameronDDC classification: 853/.1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Marilyn Migiel returns to Giovanni Boccaccio's masterpiece, this time to focus on the dialogue about ethical choices that the <em>Decameron</em> creates with us and that we, as individuals and as groups, create with the <em>Decameron</em>.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PQ4293.P4 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt18fs5vb Available ocn921143518

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Marilyn Migiel returns to Giovanni Boccaccio's masterpiece, this time to focus on the dialogue about ethical choices that the <em>Decameron</em> creates with us and that we, as individuals and as groups, create with the <em>Decameron</em>.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Original, concise, and singularly readable, this book comes as an attractive complement to Migiel's now-classic A Rhetoric of the Decameron (2003). In the present volume Migiel (Cornell Univ.) conducts a series of detailed rhetorical inquiries into key passages from Boccaccio's masterpiece (the introductions to Days 1 and 10, Day 1.10, Day 2.9, Day 3.2, Day 3.8, Day 7.4 and Day 10.4, among others), using both the original Italian and a comprehensive range of English translations from the 17th century onward. Her aim is to show how Boccaccio's "sticky and thorny" text "catches us as we move through it, compelling us to reveal who we are as well as how we relate to it and, by extension, to the world outside us" and thereby generates ethical questioning in its readers. Migiel very effectively argues that this questioning has not always been facilitated by translators operating with the perhaps unconscious, at least unacknowledged, and almost invariably unhelpful assumptions that Migiel identifies. Of obvious interest to Boccaccio scholars, this book should also appeal to other medievalists, rhetorical critics, and theorists of translation. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Steven Botterill, University of California, Berkeley

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Marilyn Migiel, Cornell University, U.S.A.<br></p>

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