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Progressive punishment : job loss, jail growth, and the neoliberal logic of carceral expansion / Judah Schept.

By: Schept, Judah Nathan [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Alternative criminology series: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (x, 309 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479802821; 1479802824.Other title: Job loss, jail growth, and the neoliberal logic of carceral expansion.Subject(s): Punishment -- United States | Corrections -- United States | Imprisonment -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Progressive punishmentDDC classification: 365/.973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Part 1. Neoliberal geographies of progressive punishment -- Capital departures and the arrival of punishment -- Consolidations and expansions: Welfare and the "alternatives" archipelago -- Part 2. "Poor conduct" and the carceral cure -- "Red neck" and "unsocialized," with "subcultural norms and values": Constructing cultural poverty and caring cages -- "A lockdown facility...with the feel of a small, private college" -- Part 3. Carceral epistemology: Knowing the jail and governing the town -- Seeing like a jail, 1: Evidence and expertise -- Seeing like a jail, 2: Corrections consulting -- Governing through expansion -- Part 4. Contesting the carceral -- Organizing against expansion -- Conclusion: Nonreformist reforms and abolitionist alternatives.
Summary: The growth of mass incarceration in the United States eludes neat categorization as a product of the political Right. Liberals played important roles in both laying the foundation for and then participating in the conservative tough-on-crime movement that is largely credited with the rise of the prison state. But can progressive polities, with their benevolent intentions, nevertheless contribute to the expansion of mass incarceration? In Progressive Punishment, Judah Schept offers an ethnographic examination into that liberal discourses about therapeutic justice and rehabilitation can uphold the logic, practices, and institutions that comprise the carceral state. Schept examines how political leaders on the Left, despite being critical of mass incarceration, advocated for a "justice campus" that would have dramatically expanded the local criminal justice system. At the root of this proposal, Schept argues, is a confluence of neoliberal-style changes in the community that naturalized prison expansion as political common sense for a community negotiating deindustrialization, urban decline, and the devolution of social welfare. While the proposal gained momentum, local activists worked to disrupt the logic of expansion and instead offer alternatives to reduce community reliance on incarceration. A well-researched and well-narrated study, Progressive Punishment provides an important and novel perspective on the relationship between liberal politics, neoliberalism, and mass incarceration. -- from back cover.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9471 .S356 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt15zc7g9 Available ocn922698381

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-299) and index.

Print version record.

Part 1. Neoliberal geographies of progressive punishment -- Capital departures and the arrival of punishment -- Consolidations and expansions: Welfare and the "alternatives" archipelago -- Part 2. "Poor conduct" and the carceral cure -- "Red neck" and "unsocialized," with "subcultural norms and values": Constructing cultural poverty and caring cages -- "A lockdown facility...with the feel of a small, private college" -- Part 3. Carceral epistemology: Knowing the jail and governing the town -- Seeing like a jail, 1: Evidence and expertise -- Seeing like a jail, 2: Corrections consulting -- Governing through expansion -- Part 4. Contesting the carceral -- Organizing against expansion -- Conclusion: Nonreformist reforms and abolitionist alternatives.

The growth of mass incarceration in the United States eludes neat categorization as a product of the political Right. Liberals played important roles in both laying the foundation for and then participating in the conservative tough-on-crime movement that is largely credited with the rise of the prison state. But can progressive polities, with their benevolent intentions, nevertheless contribute to the expansion of mass incarceration? In Progressive Punishment, Judah Schept offers an ethnographic examination into that liberal discourses about therapeutic justice and rehabilitation can uphold the logic, practices, and institutions that comprise the carceral state. Schept examines how political leaders on the Left, despite being critical of mass incarceration, advocated for a "justice campus" that would have dramatically expanded the local criminal justice system. At the root of this proposal, Schept argues, is a confluence of neoliberal-style changes in the community that naturalized prison expansion as political common sense for a community negotiating deindustrialization, urban decline, and the devolution of social welfare. While the proposal gained momentum, local activists worked to disrupt the logic of expansion and instead offer alternatives to reduce community reliance on incarceration. A well-researched and well-narrated study, Progressive Punishment provides an important and novel perspective on the relationship between liberal politics, neoliberalism, and mass incarceration. -- from back cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Schept's new book covers an incredibly dense theoretical terrain that demonstrates how those traditionally associated with critiquing the "prison industrial complex" have, under the auspices of treatment and rehabilitation, embraced the expansion of what he terms "the carceral habitus." Schept (Eastern Kentucky Univ.) offers a rich case study that explores how Bloomington, Indiana's contentious quest to develop a "justice campus" comprising traditional carceral elements (e.g., a new jail) and non-traditional elements (e.g., social services) sheds light on the larger political-economic forces at work. Central to this analysis is the literature on the use of prison-building and operation as an economic development strategy, along with the imagining of new populations to encompass in the carceral net. The exodus of an RCA/Thomson plant from Bloomington meant significant jobs losses for the area and readily available space for development. Enter consultants hired by local officials, liberals, and those on the Left who asserted their belief in rehabilitation and treatment by the state as beneficial and benign--and the logic of carceral expansion began to take shape. This is a significant contribution that crosses disciplinary boundaries. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students through faculty. --Susan Elaine Blankenship, Lake Erie College

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