James and Esther Cooper Jackson : love and courage in the black freedom movement / Sara Rzeszutek Haviland.

By: Haviland, Sara Rzeszutek [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: Civil rights and the struggle for Black equality in the twentieth century: Publisher: Lexington, KY : University Press of Kentucky, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813166278; 0813166276; 9780813166261; 0813166268; 081316625X; 9780813166254; 9780813166735; 081316673XSubject(s): African American civil rights workersGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Erscheint auch als:: love and courage in the Black freedom movementDDC classification: 920 LOC classification: E185.96Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Love and activism -- Jack and Esther's paths to activism and each other -- Radical marriage on the front lines of the double victory campaign -- The demise of the Black popular front in the postwar period -- Family and the Black freedom movement in the early Cold War years -- The Communist Party USA and Black freedom in the 1950s -- Radical journalism in the civil rights years -- Freedomways, the Communist Party USA, and Black freedom in the post-civil rights years -- Conclusion: Esther and Jack in American history.
Summary: This collective biography of James and Esther Cooper Jackson argues that, in the face of major political transformations, activists responded to new political contexts and drew on their own personal needs, demands, and relationships to craft their contributions to the black freedom movement.
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E185.96 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt17t74wc Available ocn923250353

Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed October 15, 2015).

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Love and activism -- Jack and Esther's paths to activism and each other -- Radical marriage on the front lines of the double victory campaign -- The demise of the Black popular front in the postwar period -- Family and the Black freedom movement in the early Cold War years -- The Communist Party USA and Black freedom in the 1950s -- Radical journalism in the civil rights years -- Freedomways, the Communist Party USA, and Black freedom in the post-civil rights years -- Conclusion: Esther and Jack in American history.

This collective biography of James and Esther Cooper Jackson argues that, in the face of major political transformations, activists responded to new political contexts and drew on their own personal needs, demands, and relationships to craft their contributions to the black freedom movement.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this biography of activist couple James and Esther Cooper Jackson, Haviland (history, St. Francis Coll.) details their lives in the early civil rights movement and their attraction to communism. (LJ 10/1/15) © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

St. Francis College historian Haviland's fascinating and informative book illuminates a missing chapter in the black freedom struggle and the intersection between that struggle and the Communist Party USA. Esther Cooper and James Jackson, Jr. were both children of the Talented Tenth who were aware of the poverty and deprivation of other, less fortunate African Americans. Both were members of the Communist Party, though "Jack" was an official and Esther was not. As young adults, both were leaders of the now-forgotten Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC). Both were part of the Popular Front of the 1930s, and as a married couple continued their homegrown activism for many decades. Jack was editor of the communist newspaper The Worker, while Esther was a founder and managing editor of Freedomways magazine for 25 years. The usual narrative of the "civil rights movement" includes the NAACP (founded 1909), Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Montgomery bus boycott, and the activism and legislation of the 1960s. As a consequence of McCarthyism, this mainstream account has been sanitized to omit the role of the Left, both black and white. An impressive book, and a great companion to Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists during the Great Depression (CH, Apr'91, 28-4711), by Robin Kelley. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Wayne C. Glasker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sara Rzeszutek is associate professor of history at St. Francis College. She has contributed chapters to Freedom Rights: New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement and Red Activists and Black Freedom: James and Esther Jackson and the Long Civil Rights Revolution.

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