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The racial mundane : Asian American performance and the embodied everyday / Ju Yon Kim.

By: Kim, Ju Yon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479837519; 1479837512.Subject(s): Human behavior -- Social aspects -- United States | Human body -- Social aspects -- United States | Habit -- Social aspects -- United States | Social interaction -- United States | Performance -- Social aspects -- United States | Asian Americans -- Social life and customs | Asian Americans -- Social conditions | Asian Americans -- Race identityAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Racial mundane.DDC classification: 305.895/073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Ambiguous habits and the paradox of Asian American racial formation -- Trying on the yellow jacket at the limits of our town : the routines of race and nation -- Everyday rituals and the performance of community -- Making change : interracial conflict, cross-racial performance -- Homework becomes you : the model minority and its doubles -- Afterword: The everyday Asian American online.
Scope and content: "Across the twentieth century, national controversies involving Asian Americans have drawn attention to such seemingly unremarkable activities as eating rice, greeting customers, and studying for exams. While public debates about Asian Americans have invoked quotidian practices to support inconsistent claims about racial difference, diverse aesthetic projects have tested these claims by experimenting with the relationships among habit, body, and identity. In The Racial Mundane, Ju Yon Kim argues that the ambiguous relationship between behavioral tendencies and the body has sustained paradoxical characterizations of Asian Americans as ideal and impossible Americans. The body's uncertain attachment to its routine motions promises alternately to materialize racial distinctions and to dissolve them. Kim's study focuses on works of theater, fiction, and film that explore the interface between racialized bodies and everyday enactments to reveal new and latent affiliations. The various modes of performance developed in these works not only encourage audiences to see habitual behaviors differently, but also reveal the stakes of noticing such behaviors at all. Integrating studies of race, performance, and the everyday, The Racial Mundane invites readers to reflect on how and to what effect perfunctory behaviors become objects of public scrutiny"--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.A75 K55 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt15r3xng Available ocn923734884

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Ambiguous habits and the paradox of Asian American racial formation -- Trying on the yellow jacket at the limits of our town : the routines of race and nation -- Everyday rituals and the performance of community -- Making change : interracial conflict, cross-racial performance -- Homework becomes you : the model minority and its doubles -- Afterword: The everyday Asian American online.

"Across the twentieth century, national controversies involving Asian Americans have drawn attention to such seemingly unremarkable activities as eating rice, greeting customers, and studying for exams. While public debates about Asian Americans have invoked quotidian practices to support inconsistent claims about racial difference, diverse aesthetic projects have tested these claims by experimenting with the relationships among habit, body, and identity. In The Racial Mundane, Ju Yon Kim argues that the ambiguous relationship between behavioral tendencies and the body has sustained paradoxical characterizations of Asian Americans as ideal and impossible Americans. The body's uncertain attachment to its routine motions promises alternately to materialize racial distinctions and to dissolve them. Kim's study focuses on works of theater, fiction, and film that explore the interface between racialized bodies and everyday enactments to reveal new and latent affiliations. The various modes of performance developed in these works not only encourage audiences to see habitual behaviors differently, but also reveal the stakes of noticing such behaviors at all. Integrating studies of race, performance, and the everyday, The Racial Mundane invites readers to reflect on how and to what effect perfunctory behaviors become objects of public scrutiny"--Publisher's website.

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