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The executed God : the way of the cross in lockdown America / Mark Lewis Taylor.

By: Taylor, Mark L. (Mark Lewis), 1951- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Minneapolis [Minnesota] : Fortress Press, [2015]; Baltimore, Maryland : Project Muse, 2015Edition: Revised and expanded second edition.Description: 1 online resource (1 PDF (xxx, 528 pages)).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781506401454; 1506401457.Subject(s): Christianity and justice -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Capital punishment -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Imprisonment -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Punishment -- Religious aspects -- ChristianityAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 261.8336 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface to the second edition -- Preface -- Introduction -- The executed God -- part I. The theatrics of state terror -- 1. Lockdown America : a theater of terror -- 2. Theatrics and sacrifice in the U.S.-led imperium -- part II. A counter-theatrics to state terror -- 3. Way of the cross as adversarial politics -- 4. Stealing the show: way of the cross as dramatic action -- 5. Building peoples' movements : 1. Demilitarizing U.S. police and decarcerating the U.S.A. -- 6. Building peoples' movements : 2. Abolishing capital punishment(s) -- Epilogue. Christian living : toward a fullness of rebellion.
Summary: The new edition of Mark Lewis Taylor's award-winning The Executed God is both a searing indictment of the structures of "Lockdown America" and a visionary statement of hope. It is also a call for action to Jesus followers to resist US imperial projects and power. Outlining a "theatrics of state terror," Taylor identifies and analyzes its instruments--mass incarceration, militarized police tactics, surveillance, torture, immigrant repression, and capital punishment--through which a racist and corporatized Lockdown America enforces in the US a global neoliberal economic and political imperialism. Against this, The Executed God proposes a "counter-theatrics to state terror," a declamation of the way of the cross for Jesus followers that unmasks the powers of US state domination and enacts an adversarial politics of resistance, artful dramatic actions, and the building of peoples' movements. These are all intrinsic to a Christian politics of remembrance of the Jesus executed by empire. Heralded in its first edition, this new edition is thoroughly revised, updated, and expanded, offering a demanding rethinking and recreating of what being a Christian is and of how Christianity should dream, hope, mobilize, and act to bring about what Taylor terms "a liberating material spirituality" to unseat the state that kills.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV8687 .T39 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt155j3fk Available ocn925256914

Includes bibliographical references (pages 473-478) and indexes.

Preface to the second edition -- Preface -- Introduction -- The executed God -- part I. The theatrics of state terror -- 1. Lockdown America : a theater of terror -- 2. Theatrics and sacrifice in the U.S.-led imperium -- part II. A counter-theatrics to state terror -- 3. Way of the cross as adversarial politics -- 4. Stealing the show: way of the cross as dramatic action -- 5. Building peoples' movements : 1. Demilitarizing U.S. police and decarcerating the U.S.A. -- 6. Building peoples' movements : 2. Abolishing capital punishment(s) -- Epilogue. Christian living : toward a fullness of rebellion.

The new edition of Mark Lewis Taylor's award-winning The Executed God is both a searing indictment of the structures of "Lockdown America" and a visionary statement of hope. It is also a call for action to Jesus followers to resist US imperial projects and power. Outlining a "theatrics of state terror," Taylor identifies and analyzes its instruments--mass incarceration, militarized police tactics, surveillance, torture, immigrant repression, and capital punishment--through which a racist and corporatized Lockdown America enforces in the US a global neoliberal economic and political imperialism. Against this, The Executed God proposes a "counter-theatrics to state terror," a declamation of the way of the cross for Jesus followers that unmasks the powers of US state domination and enacts an adversarial politics of resistance, artful dramatic actions, and the building of peoples' movements. These are all intrinsic to a Christian politics of remembrance of the Jesus executed by empire. Heralded in its first edition, this new edition is thoroughly revised, updated, and expanded, offering a demanding rethinking and recreating of what being a Christian is and of how Christianity should dream, hope, mobilize, and act to bring about what Taylor terms "a liberating material spirituality" to unseat the state that kills.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this work, Taylor (theology and culture, Princeton Theological Seminary) discusses the similarities between the current U.S. prison system and that of imperial Rome, where Jesus Christ and his followers were considered a criminal element. He explains how economics, a culture of terror, and other methods of catalyzing people have created a "lockdown society" in which the downtrodden suffer punitive indignities. The rise of the prison population, under the premise of protecting society, has diminished the freedom for society as a whole, with the United States leading the way for a global lockdown. Taylor shows how ancient Rome saw the crucifixion as a just deterrent and method of control over poorer and slave populations who might threaten the system of imperial privilege if they resisted authority. Jesus created a popular movement that dared to challenge the elite, leading Pontius Pilate to deploy his only means of control over the unrest execution. Taylor points to a current movement that also seeks to undermine police brutality, prison industries, and the death penalty. This book serves as a reminder and expos of the systemic failure of criminal justice as it creates more victims of crime and dishonors those already victimized, but Taylor strays from his premise. This is recommended only for larger religious and sociology collections. Leo Kriz, West Des Moines P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Taylor (Princeton Theological Seminary) understands capital punishment, the prison-industrial complex, and police brutality and intimidation as major components of a "theatrics of terror" applied by an elite class. The power of the elite is rooted in an economics that produces conditions of increasing inequality. Executions, incarceration, and fear of the police are the means of controlling harmful political effects of rage potentially emerging from that inequality. Those controlled are primarily ethnic and racial minorities, and the poor; but as executions, imprisonment, and police brutality increase, the effects of control are extended, resulting in a threat to all, as "we become acculturated to an ethos of domination." Taylor uses terms familiar from leftist protest movements, but he has an analysis and message that is his own. His proposed response to this condition is an "adversarial politics" of demonstrations--a "theatric of counterterror"--that will "steal the show" from the theatrics of terror. He seeks to reveal how the adversarial politics needed today have roots in the life and words of Jesus and in the history of the early Christian movements. He particularly refers to Paul and to the Gospel of Mark. These are appropriate references, and his interpretations are aptly made. Graduate students, faculty and researchers, professionals and practitioners. R. L. Herrick emeritus, Westmar University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mark Lewis Taylor is the Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Theology and Culture at Princeton Theological Seminary. Among his numerous books are The Theological and the Political: On the Weight of the World (Fortress Press 2011), Religion, Politics, and the Christian Right: Post-9/11 Powers in American Empire (Fortress Press 2005), and Remembering Esperanza: A Cultural-Political Theology for North American Praxis (2005).

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