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The beginning and end of rape : confronting sexual violence in native America / Sarah Deer.

By: Deer, Sarah, 1972- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781452945743; 1452945748.Subject(s): Rape -- Law and legislation -- United States | Indian women -- Crimes against -- United States | Indian women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beginning and end of rapeDDC classification: 345.73/02532 Other classification: LAW110000 | SOC021000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Sovereignty of the Soul; 1. Knowing through Numbers?; 2. What She Say It Be Law; 3. At the Mercy of the State; 4. All Apologies; 5. Relocation Revisited; 6. Punishing the Victim; 7. The Enigma of Federal Reform; 8. Toward an Indigenous Jurisprudence of Rape; 9. The Trouble with Peacemaking; 10. ""Righting Tribal Rape Law; Conclusion: The End of Rape in Native America; Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Notes; Publication History; Index
Summary: "Despite what major media sources say, violence against Native women is not an epidemic. An epidemic is biological and blameless. Violence against Native women is historical and political, bounded by oppression and colonial violence. This book, like all of Sarah Deer's work, is aimed at engaging the problem head-on--and ending it.The Beginning and End of Rape collects and expands the powerful writings in which Deer, who played a crucial role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2013, has advocated for cultural and legal reforms to protect Native women from endemic sexual violence and abuse. Deer provides a clear historical overview of rape and sex trafficking in North America, paying particular attention to the gendered legacy of colonialism in tribal nations--a truth largely overlooked or minimized by Native and non-Native observers. She faces this legacy directly, articulating strategies for Native communities and tribal nations seeking redress. In a damning critique of federal law that has accommodated rape by destroying tribal legal systems, she describes how tribal self-determination efforts of the twenty-first century can be leveraged to eradicate violence against women. Her work bridges the gap between Indian law and feminist thinking by explaining how intersectional approaches are vital to addressing the rape of Native women.Grounded in historical, cultural, and legal realities, both Native and non-Native, these essays point to the possibility of actual and positive change in a world where Native women are systematically undervalued, left unprotected, and hurt. Deer draws on her extensive experiences in advocacy and activism to present specific, practical recommendations and plans of action for making the world safer for all. "-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KIE3560 .D44 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt17w8gfr Available ocn925478625

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Despite what major media sources say, violence against Native women is not an epidemic. An epidemic is biological and blameless. Violence against Native women is historical and political, bounded by oppression and colonial violence. This book, like all of Sarah Deer's work, is aimed at engaging the problem head-on--and ending it.The Beginning and End of Rape collects and expands the powerful writings in which Deer, who played a crucial role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2013, has advocated for cultural and legal reforms to protect Native women from endemic sexual violence and abuse. Deer provides a clear historical overview of rape and sex trafficking in North America, paying particular attention to the gendered legacy of colonialism in tribal nations--a truth largely overlooked or minimized by Native and non-Native observers. She faces this legacy directly, articulating strategies for Native communities and tribal nations seeking redress. In a damning critique of federal law that has accommodated rape by destroying tribal legal systems, she describes how tribal self-determination efforts of the twenty-first century can be leveraged to eradicate violence against women. Her work bridges the gap between Indian law and feminist thinking by explaining how intersectional approaches are vital to addressing the rape of Native women.Grounded in historical, cultural, and legal realities, both Native and non-Native, these essays point to the possibility of actual and positive change in a world where Native women are systematically undervalued, left unprotected, and hurt. Deer draws on her extensive experiences in advocacy and activism to present specific, practical recommendations and plans of action for making the world safer for all. "-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Introduction: Sovereignty of the Soul; 1. Knowing through Numbers?; 2. What She Say It Be Law; 3. At the Mercy of the State; 4. All Apologies; 5. Relocation Revisited; 6. Punishing the Victim; 7. The Enigma of Federal Reform; 8. Toward an Indigenous Jurisprudence of Rape; 9. The Trouble with Peacemaking; 10. ""Righting Tribal Rape Law; Conclusion: The End of Rape in Native America; Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Notes; Publication History; Index

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Approximately one in three American Indian women will be raped. This leads Deer to point to newspaper headlines depicting the problem to be at epidemic levels. She is clear, however, that this is no epidemic. Epidemics are sudden and quickly moving. Rape among Native women has been around for quite some time and has gotten worse as policies and laws aimed at helping tribal nations have had, in many cases, the opposite effect. In the case of rape, the loss of sovereignty, creation of confusing jurisdictional boundaries, and a plethora of laws that create loopholes combine to create a situation ripe for domestic violence and rape to occur. The author uses her 20-plus years of experience as a rape counselor, an activist, and a scholar to write an outstanding work that not only explains why rape in Indian country has reached epidemic levels but also provides readers with practical solutions. They are derived from the experiences of the victims rather than from afar, which, as the author clearly demonstrates, has been a contributing factor to the problem. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Jeffrey S. Ashley, Eastern Illinois University

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