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Encounters with British composers / Andrew Palmer.

By: Palmer, Andrew, 1959- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Woodbridge : The Boydell Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (416 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781782046417; 1782046410; 9781782046615; 1782046615.Subject(s): Composers -- Great Britain -- Biography | Music -- Great BritainAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Encounters with British composersDDC classification: 780.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: This book features interviews with leading and upcoming British composers who use the same raw materials but produce classical music that takes very different forms. Uniquely, Andrew Palmer approaches the sometimes baffling world of contemporary music from the point of view of the inquisitive, music-loving amateur rather than the professional critic or musicologist. Readers can eavesdrop on conversations in which composers are asked a number of questions about their professional lives and practices, with the emphasis on the aesthetic sensibilities and psychological processes behind composing rather than technique. Throughout, the book seeks to explore why composers write the kind of music they write, and what they want their music to do. Along the way, readers are confronted with an unspoken but equally important question: if some composers are writing music that the public doesn't want to engage with, who's to blame for that? Are composers out of touch with their public, or are we too lazy to give their music the attention it deserves?
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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ML390 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt1814gv6 Available ocn927169024

This book features interviews with leading and upcoming British composers who use the same raw materials but produce classical music that takes very different forms. Uniquely, Andrew Palmer approaches the sometimes baffling world of contemporary music from the point of view of the inquisitive, music-loving amateur rather than the professional critic or musicologist. Readers can eavesdrop on conversations in which composers are asked a number of questions about their professional lives and practices, with the emphasis on the aesthetic sensibilities and psychological processes behind composing rather than technique. Throughout, the book seeks to explore why composers write the kind of music they write, and what they want their music to do. Along the way, readers are confronted with an unspoken but equally important question: if some composers are writing music that the public doesn't want to engage with, who's to blame for that? Are composers out of touch with their public, or are we too lazy to give their music the attention it deserves?

Includes index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Following along the lines of R. Murray Schafer's British Composers in Interview (1963) and Paul Griffiths's New Sounds, New Personalities: British Composers of the 1980s in Conversation with Paul Griffiths (CH, May'86), Palmer presents 39 interviews, conducted between 2011 and 2015, with British composers born from 1928 to 1988. Some rose to international prominence; others are not well known outside the UK. Even having lived in Great Britain for a substantial part of their professional lives, these composers say their music does not sound especially (or traditionally) "British." Their methods vary widely, but most agree about maintaining a balance between the emotional and intellectual sides of composition. Another common theme arises: the difficulty in getting started and the extraordinary effort required to achieve success. The composers provide illuminating details about what goes on in their individual workshops. Brief biographies precede the interviews, and each interview is introduced by a photographic portrait and description of the special circumstances leading up to the interview. An appendix offers advice for young composers. This is not an ordinary Q&A compilation. Palmer provided the general questions beforehand and then elicited candid and personal information not likely to be found in other biographical resources, rendering the responses with clarity and sympathy. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. --John E. Druesedow, Duke University

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