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Lincoln and the Border States : preserving the Union / William C. Harris.

By: Harris, William C. (William Charles), 1933-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, ©2011Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700620562; 0700620567.Subject(s): Slaves -- Emancipation -- Border States | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Lincoln and the Border States.DDC classification: 973.7/1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Border States and Lincoln's election -- After Fort Sumter : crisis in Maryland -- Kentucky : experiment in neutrality -- Missouri : a state in turmoil -- Lincoln's emancipation initiatives and the Border States -- The struggle over emancipation -- Resistance in Kentucky, 1863-1865 -- Union and emancipation triumphant : Maryland -- Union and emancipation triumphant : Missouri.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E459 .H29 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ckpbpm Available ocn927384338

The Border States and Lincoln's election -- After Fort Sumter : crisis in Maryland -- Kentucky : experiment in neutrality -- Missouri : a state in turmoil -- Lincoln's emancipation initiatives and the Border States -- The struggle over emancipation -- Resistance in Kentucky, 1863-1865 -- Union and emancipation triumphant : Maryland -- Union and emancipation triumphant : Missouri.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Henry Adams Prize winner Harris (history, emeritus, North Carolina State Univ.; Lincoln's Rise to the Presidency) has done something new in Lincoln and Civil War studies; he has written a cogent argument on the ways the politics of keeping the crucial border states in the Union informed, and almost transformed, policies on civil-military relations, emancipation, arming black troops, civil liberties, and more. Lincoln supposedly once said that he "hoped to have God on his side but must have Kentucky." Harris pinpoints the military and political reasons such a priority weighed on Lincoln. He goes deep inside the state politics especially of Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri to discover the machinations of pro-Union and pro-Southern interests to keep their states in or take them out of the Union, protect or repeal slavery, and prevent the war from degenerating into a social revolution and outlawry. Harris argues that Lincoln's broad perspective on how to win the war, his patience and forbearance, and his keen sense of political necessities and personalities saved the border states for the Union and thus did much to preserve the Union. VERDICT Harris's probing work brings the border states back to center stage and demonstrates how and why Lincoln mastered the art of balancing competing interests without yielding on the essential priority-an insightful lesson on leadership that speaks to our own day. Highly recommended.-Randall M. Miller, Saint Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

One of the hallmarks of Abraham Lincoln's wartime presidency was the dilemma of the border slave states that remained in the Union despite pro-Confederate sentiment from significant blocs of their citizenry. Lincoln's efforts to keep them in the Union during the early months of the war have been well documented, but there is a paucity of scholarly attention for the remainder of the conflict. Noted Civil War historian Harris (emer., North Carolina State Univ.) fills this lacuna with a thorough narrative of the complex relationship between Lincoln and the Border States (though he rarely touches on Delaware). Arguing that Border State relations were the most complex issue of Lincoln's presidency--even more so than emancipation--Harris concludes that, save for a few missteps, Lincoln's ability to keep them in the Union was his signal accomplishment. By ensuring the Border States would not bolt the Union in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln had to assiduously cultivate political support, which ultimately helped rally Union opinion as a whole. In its detailed focus on Border State governors and political leaders, Harris's treatment is an excellent study of the complicated intersection of local and national politics during the Civil War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. K. M. Gannon Grand View University

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