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Varmints and victims : predator control in the American West / Frank Van Nuys.

By: Van Nuys, Frank, 1961-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700621682; 0700621687.Subject(s): Grizzly bear -- Control -- West (U.S.) | Puma -- Control -- West (U.S.) | Coyote -- Control -- West (U.S.) | Wolves -- Control -- West (U.S.) | Predatory animals -- Control -- Government policy -- West (U.S.) | Predatory animals -- Control -- West (U.S.)Additional physical formats: Print version:: Varmints and victims.DDC classification: 591.5/30978 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Unlike books that have focused on the extinction or eradication of one particular animal in the West (such as buffalo, wolves, or bears), Frank Van Nuys's book is the first comprehensive examination of predatory control efforts in the West. Focusing primarily on wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, and grizzly bears--the predators Americans feared and grappled with the most--Van Nuys charts the logic and methods of predator control and the ranchers, hunters, and federal officials who managed it. In the process, Van Nuys shows that the story of predator control is the story of the American West itself, from early attempts to connect the region to mainstream American life and economics to changing demographic patterns and opinions on wildlife conservation in the 21st century"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "It used to be: If you see a coyote, shoot it. Better yet, a bear. Best of all, perhaps? A wolf. How we've gotten from there to here, where such predators are reintroduced, protected, and in some cases revered, is the story Frank Van Nuys tells in Varmints and Victims, a thorough and enlightening look at the evolution of predator management in the American West. As controversies over predator control rage on, Varmints and Victims puts the debate into historical context, tracing the West's relationship with charismatic predators like grizzlies, wolves, and cougars from unquestioned eradication to ambivalent recovery efforts. Van Nuys offers a nuanced and balanced perspective on an often-emotional topic, exploring the intricacies of how and why attitudes toward predators have changed over the years. Focusing primarily on wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, and grizzly bears, he charts the logic and methods of management practiced by ranchers, hunters, and federal officials. Broad in scope and rich in detail, this work brings new, much-needed clarity to the complex interweaving of economics, politics, science, and culture in the formulation of ideas about predator species, and in policies directed at these creatures. In the process, we come to see how the story of predator control is in many ways the story of the American West itself, from early attempts to connect the frontier region to mainstream American life and economics to present ideas about the nature and singularity of the region"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
SF810.6.U6 V36 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ckpb8d Available ocn927446608

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Unlike books that have focused on the extinction or eradication of one particular animal in the West (such as buffalo, wolves, or bears), Frank Van Nuys's book is the first comprehensive examination of predatory control efforts in the West. Focusing primarily on wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, and grizzly bears--the predators Americans feared and grappled with the most--Van Nuys charts the logic and methods of predator control and the ranchers, hunters, and federal officials who managed it. In the process, Van Nuys shows that the story of predator control is the story of the American West itself, from early attempts to connect the region to mainstream American life and economics to changing demographic patterns and opinions on wildlife conservation in the 21st century"-- Provided by publisher.

"It used to be: If you see a coyote, shoot it. Better yet, a bear. Best of all, perhaps? A wolf. How we've gotten from there to here, where such predators are reintroduced, protected, and in some cases revered, is the story Frank Van Nuys tells in Varmints and Victims, a thorough and enlightening look at the evolution of predator management in the American West. As controversies over predator control rage on, Varmints and Victims puts the debate into historical context, tracing the West's relationship with charismatic predators like grizzlies, wolves, and cougars from unquestioned eradication to ambivalent recovery efforts. Van Nuys offers a nuanced and balanced perspective on an often-emotional topic, exploring the intricacies of how and why attitudes toward predators have changed over the years. Focusing primarily on wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, and grizzly bears, he charts the logic and methods of management practiced by ranchers, hunters, and federal officials. Broad in scope and rich in detail, this work brings new, much-needed clarity to the complex interweaving of economics, politics, science, and culture in the formulation of ideas about predator species, and in policies directed at these creatures. In the process, we come to see how the story of predator control is in many ways the story of the American West itself, from early attempts to connect the frontier region to mainstream American life and economics to present ideas about the nature and singularity of the region"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this accessible, yet scholarly, volume about the American journey from predator extirpation to predator recovery and conservation, historian Frank Van Nuys (South Dakota School of Mines & Technology) builds on previous work about this topic by Dunlap (Texas A&M Univ.), Coleman (Univ. of Notre Dame), and others. Delving into archival material, the author focuses on wildlife management in the American West--looking beyond wolves to grizzly bears, cougars, and coyotes. He furnishes considerable detail on government-supported predator killing. He then discusses how, from the 1930s through 1950s, scientists such as Aldo Leopold, Adolph and Olaus Murie, George M. Wright, Paul Errington, and others reframed views of predators. Though this book could have used a deeper treatment of the science of predator management since 1990 (including exploration of topics with fascinating historical antecedents, such as trophic cascades), it will be a strong resource for undergraduate and graduate students seeking a better understanding of humans' controversial relationships with predators. Analysis of expert work (such as that of former government biologist Carter Niemeyer, who is helping enlighten others as predators recover and are removed from the Endangered Species List) provide a solid ending and rich fodder for discussion. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers through researchers/faculty. --Cristina Eisenberg, Earthwatch Institute

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