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George Smart and nineteenth-century London concert life / john Carnelley.

By: Carnelley, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Music in Britain, 1600-2000: v.12.Publisher: Woodbridge : Boydell & Brewer Ltd. 2015Description: 1 online resource (272 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781782045922; 1782045929.Subject(s): Conductors (Music) -- England -- Biography | Composers -- England -- Biography | Music -- England -- London -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: George Smart and nineteenth-century London concert lifeDDC classification: 780 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontcover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 George Smart and the Musical Profession: 1776-1825; 2 London Concert Life: 1805-25; 3 George Smart's Concert Activities: 1800-25; 4 Interlude -- London and the Continent in 1825; 5 New Musical Directions: 1826-30; 6 Change and Conflict: 1830-44; 7 Retirement and Old Age: 1844-67; Appendices; 1 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart in 1825; 2 Concert Licences Issued by the Lord Chamberlain: 1810, 1815, 1820, and 1825; 3 Records of Smart's Concert Activity; 3:1 Philharmonic Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1816-25
3:2 London Amateur (City) Concerts3:3 London Subscription Concerts; 3:4 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1830-39; 3:5 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1840-58; 4 Totals of Performances Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1798-1858; 5 Church Music by G. T. Smart Knt.; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Sir George Thomas Smart (1776-1867) was a significant musical animateur of the early nineteenth century, who earned his living primarily as a conductor but was also significant as an organist, composer and recorder of events. Smart established successful and pioneering London concert series, was a prime mover in the setting up of the Philharmonic Society and the Royal Academy of Music, and taught many of the leading singers of the day, being well versed in the Handelian concert tradition. He also conducted the opera at the Covent Garden Theatre and introduced significant new works to the public - he was most notably an early champion of the music of Beethoven. His journeys to Europe, and his contacts with the leading European musical figures of the day (including Weber, Meyerbeer, Spohr, and Mendelssohn), were crucial to the direction music was to take in nineteenth-century Britain. This detailed account of Smart's life and career presents him within the context of the vibrant concert life of London and wider European musical culture. It is the first full length, critical study of this influential musical figure.0.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML410.S6 C37 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt17mvjv7 Available ocn932124854

Sir George Thomas Smart (1776-1867) was a significant musical animateur of the early nineteenth century, who earned his living primarily as a conductor but was also significant as an organist, composer and recorder of events. Smart established successful and pioneering London concert series, was a prime mover in the setting up of the Philharmonic Society and the Royal Academy of Music, and taught many of the leading singers of the day, being well versed in the Handelian concert tradition. He also conducted the opera at the Covent Garden Theatre and introduced significant new works to the public - he was most notably an early champion of the music of Beethoven. His journeys to Europe, and his contacts with the leading European musical figures of the day (including Weber, Meyerbeer, Spohr, and Mendelssohn), were crucial to the direction music was to take in nineteenth-century Britain. This detailed account of Smart's life and career presents him within the context of the vibrant concert life of London and wider European musical culture. It is the first full length, critical study of this influential musical figure.0.

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-303) and index.

Frontcover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 George Smart and the Musical Profession: 1776-1825; 2 London Concert Life: 1805-25; 3 George Smart's Concert Activities: 1800-25; 4 Interlude -- London and the Continent in 1825; 5 New Musical Directions: 1826-30; 6 Change and Conflict: 1830-44; 7 Retirement and Old Age: 1844-67; Appendices; 1 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart in 1825; 2 Concert Licences Issued by the Lord Chamberlain: 1810, 1815, 1820, and 1825; 3 Records of Smart's Concert Activity; 3:1 Philharmonic Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1816-25

3:2 London Amateur (City) Concerts3:3 London Subscription Concerts; 3:4 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1830-39; 3:5 Concerts Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1840-58; 4 Totals of Performances Conducted by G. T. Smart: 1798-1858; 5 Church Music by G. T. Smart Knt.; Bibliography; Index

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Conductor Sir George Smart dominated musical life in London in the 1820s and 1830s. In this biography, Carnelley (Dulwich College, UK) details Smart's life and his role in the London concert scene. Though events such as Weber's and Mendelssohn's London visits have been previously documented, Carnelley is the first to place those special occasions in the context of routine musical life, and to put Weber's London operas in the context of Smart's attempts to broaden musical tastes. Smart--who was one of the first conductors to use a baton--founded several concert series, connected with European composers, and helped create a lively musical scene in London. Whereas the London concert scene has been previously discussed as dull and inactive, Carnelley presents a revisionist view, demonstrating the vibrancy of the city and Smart's position at the core of concert life. Smart's success continued into his years of retirement: he remained involved in music as an elder statesman. Source materials include Smart's often-detailed diaries (extracts published as Leaves from the Journals of George Smart, 1907), many materials he left to the British Library, and newspaper articles and other contemporaneous publications. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Jane Girdham, Saginaw Valley State University

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