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Revolution within the revolution : women and gender politics in Cuba, 1952-1962 / Michelle Chase.

By: Chase, Michelle [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Envisioning Cuba: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xii, 292 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469625027; 1469625024.Subject(s): Women's rights -- CubaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Revolution within the revolutionDDC classification: 305.42097291 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Dead cities and other forms of protest, 1952-1955 -- The domestication of violence, 1955-1958 -- Maternalism and the moral authority of revolution, 1956-1958 -- The new woman and the old Left, 1959-1960 -- From the consumer's revolution to the economic war, 1959-1962 -- The destruction and salvation of the Cuban family, 1959-1962.
Summary: "A handful of celebrated photographs show armed, fatigues-clad female Cuban insurgents alongside their compañeros in Cuba's remote mountains during the revolutionary struggle. However, the story of women's part in the struggle's success only now receives comprehensive consideration in Michelle Chase's history of women and gender politics in revolutionary Cuba. Restoring to history women's participation in the all-important urban insurrection, and resisting Fidel Castro's triumphant claim that women's emancipation was handed to them as a 'revolution within the revolution,' Chase's work demonstrates that women's activism and leadership was critical at every stage of the revolutionary process."-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1507 .C43 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469625010_chase Available ocn932625450

Dead cities and other forms of protest, 1952-1955 -- The domestication of violence, 1955-1958 -- Maternalism and the moral authority of revolution, 1956-1958 -- The new woman and the old Left, 1959-1960 -- From the consumer's revolution to the economic war, 1959-1962 -- The destruction and salvation of the Cuban family, 1959-1962.

"A handful of celebrated photographs show armed, fatigues-clad female Cuban insurgents alongside their compañeros in Cuba's remote mountains during the revolutionary struggle. However, the story of women's part in the struggle's success only now receives comprehensive consideration in Michelle Chase's history of women and gender politics in revolutionary Cuba. Restoring to history women's participation in the all-important urban insurrection, and resisting Fidel Castro's triumphant claim that women's emancipation was handed to them as a 'revolution within the revolution,' Chase's work demonstrates that women's activism and leadership was critical at every stage of the revolutionary process."-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a gendered history of the "revolutionary moment," the period between Fulgencio Batista's 1952 coup and the early Cuban Revolution before the consolidation of socialism after 1962. Historian Chase (Bloomfield College) argues that women were critical players in the Cuban Revolution, which, in addition to forging a new economic and political order, also fostered redefinitions of femininity and masculinity. By depicting Cuban women as protagonists, Chase successfully dispels the myth that they were mere beneficiaries of a fundamentally top-down revolution. One of the most compelling aspects of this book is the author's insistence that women's mobilization on the bases of maternalism, moral authority, and, subsequently, as citizens and workers shaped the revolutionary agenda on women's rights. Moreover, this book's unique focus on urban insurrection foregrounds the "creative repertoire of dissent" that catapulted women to the center of revolutionary struggle, at least before 1955. Chase's nuanced analysis of the centrality of gender politics to revolutionary struggle merits praise for opening up a promising new direction in the study of the Cuban Revolution, and for reinvigorating dialogue about the Revolution's social legacy in this momentous time in US-Cuban relations. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Bonnie A. Lucero, University of Texas-Pan American

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