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They leave their kidneys in the fields : illness, injury, and illegality among U.S. farmworkers / Sarah Bronwen Horton.

By: Horton, Sarah Bronwen [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.California series in public anthropology: 40.Publisher: Oakland, California : University of California Press, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 250 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780520962545; 0520962540.Other title: Illness, injury, and illegality among U.S. farmworkers.Subject(s): Migrant agricultural laborers -- Health and hygiene -- California -- Central Valley | Migrant agricultural laborers -- California -- Central Valley -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: "They leave their kidneys in the fields"DDC classification: 363.11/96309794 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: "They Leave Their Kidneys in the Fields" -- Entering farmwork : migrations and men's work identities -- Burning up : heat illness in California's fields -- Identity loan : document exchange in migrant communities -- "Child neglect" : the invisible labor of teens -- Alt presión : the physiological toll of farmwork -- Ivaro's casket : heat illness and chronic disease at work -- "Desabilitado" : kidney disease and the disability assistance hole -- Diverted retirement : the pension crisis among elderly farmworkers -- Conclusion : strategies towards change -- Appendix A. On engaged anthropology and ethnographic writing -- Appendix B. Methods -- Appendix C. Synopses of core research participants.
Summary: "They Leave Their Kidneys in the Fields takes the reader on an ethnographic tour of the melon and corn harvesting fields in California's Central Valley to understand why farmworkers die at work each summer. Laden with captivating detail of farmworkers' daily work and home lives, Horton examines how U.S. immigration policy and the historic exclusion of farmworkers from the promises of liberalism has made migrant farmworkers what she calls 'exceptional workers.' She explores the deeply intertwined political, legal, and social factors that place Latino migrants at particular risk of illness and injury in the fields, as well as the patchwork of health care, disability, and Social Security policies that provide them little succor when they become sick or grow old. The book takes an in-depth look at the work risks faced by migrants at all stages of life: as teens, in their middle-age, and ultimately as elderly workers. By following the lives of a core group of farmworkers over nearly a decade, Horton provides a searing portrait of how their precarious immigration and work statuses culminate in preventable morbidity and premature death"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD1527.C2 H67 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1ch7925 Available ocn933211571

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: "They Leave Their Kidneys in the Fields" -- Entering farmwork : migrations and men's work identities -- Burning up : heat illness in California's fields -- Identity loan : document exchange in migrant communities -- "Child neglect" : the invisible labor of teens -- Alt presión : the physiological toll of farmwork -- Ivaro's casket : heat illness and chronic disease at work -- "Desabilitado" : kidney disease and the disability assistance hole -- Diverted retirement : the pension crisis among elderly farmworkers -- Conclusion : strategies towards change -- Appendix A. On engaged anthropology and ethnographic writing -- Appendix B. Methods -- Appendix C. Synopses of core research participants.

"They Leave Their Kidneys in the Fields takes the reader on an ethnographic tour of the melon and corn harvesting fields in California's Central Valley to understand why farmworkers die at work each summer. Laden with captivating detail of farmworkers' daily work and home lives, Horton examines how U.S. immigration policy and the historic exclusion of farmworkers from the promises of liberalism has made migrant farmworkers what she calls 'exceptional workers.' She explores the deeply intertwined political, legal, and social factors that place Latino migrants at particular risk of illness and injury in the fields, as well as the patchwork of health care, disability, and Social Security policies that provide them little succor when they become sick or grow old. The book takes an in-depth look at the work risks faced by migrants at all stages of life: as teens, in their middle-age, and ultimately as elderly workers. By following the lives of a core group of farmworkers over nearly a decade, Horton provides a searing portrait of how their precarious immigration and work statuses culminate in preventable morbidity and premature death"--Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on July 06, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Using ethnographic methods, anthropologist Horton (Univ. of Colorado, Denver) brilliantly examines migrant farmworkers' health in California's Central Valley. The leading cause of work-related death for farmworkers is heat stroke, and Horton follows a group of farmworkers over ten years in the corn and melon fields to understand why. By investigating policies that place farmworkers at risk in the fields, she offers new insights into the multiple factors that contribute to the high rates of heat death among them. Instead of the traditional viewpoints often found in occupational studies of farmworker health that focus on individual behavioral choices that place farmworkers at risk for heat illness, Horton uses ethnographic immersion as an important research method to illuminate farmworkers' viewpoints on what causes heat death and illness in the field. By capturing the narratives of farmworkers in vivid detail, she examines the causes of farmworkers' vulnerability at work, income strategies migrants use to survive, government policies that put farmworker families at risk, high rates of undiagnosed cardiovascular disease, and the cumulative effects of chronic heat illness. Horton keenly advocates for measures to remedy farmworkers' health, such as ending policies of agricultural exceptionalism, reforming the health care and immigration systems, and promoting labor policies to improve farmworkers' health. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Students, researchers, practitioners. --Debra E. Bill, West Chester University

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