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The vice of luxury : economic excess in a consumer age / David Cloutier.

By: Cloutier, David M, 1972- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Moral traditions series: Publisher: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xi, 315 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781626162570; 1626162573.Subject(s): Luxury -- Moral and ethical aspects | Wealth -- Moral and ethical aspects | Wealth -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Consumption (Economics) -- Moral and ethical aspectsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Vice of luxuryDDC classification: 241/.68 LOC classification: BJ1535.L9 | C58 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Chapter 1. Why Luxury? -- Chapter 2. Luxury in History : A Brief Survey -- Chapter 3. Neglected Vice : How Luxury Degrades Us, Our Work, and Our Communities -- Chapter 4. Neglected Sacramentality : Why Luxury Blocks a Spirituality of our Material Goods -- Chapter 5. Neglecting Positionality : Why Luxury Does Not Necessarily Help the Economy -- Chapter 6. Luxury Defined -- Chapter 7. Luxury and Social Context : Who Has More Than Enough? -- Chapter 8. Luxury and Necessity : What is Enough? -- Chapter 9. Luxury and Sacrament : What's Beyond Enough? -- Conclusion. Resisting with Discipline, Responding with Hope.
Summary: The problem of luxury has been neglected in contemporary Christian theology and philosophy, as well as in the broader social debate about the morality of our common economic life. And according to moral theologian David Cloutier this neglect of luxury has had harmful consequences: Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian traditions are filled with critiques of luxury as a vice that is destructive both to individual persons and to society. Current and recent studies of economic ethics focus on the structural problems of poverty, of international trade, of workers' rights--but rarely if ever do such studies speak directly to the excesses of the wealthy, including the middle classes of advanced economies. What happened? Why has the unquenchable pursuit of a luxury lifestyle gotten a free pass? In interpreting luxury as a moral problem, Cloutier proposes a new approach to economic ethics that moves beyond pro-market v. anti-market screeds and focuses attention on our everyday economic choices. In Part 1 he surveys the history of Christian attitudes toward luxury and greed and provides a primer on economics; in Part 2 he examines the meaning of luxury and how to develop a prudential ethic of consumption that is compatible with Christian morality.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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BJ1535.L9 C58 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt19cc2q0 Available ocn934626705

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-300) and index.

The problem of luxury has been neglected in contemporary Christian theology and philosophy, as well as in the broader social debate about the morality of our common economic life. And according to moral theologian David Cloutier this neglect of luxury has had harmful consequences: Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian traditions are filled with critiques of luxury as a vice that is destructive both to individual persons and to society. Current and recent studies of economic ethics focus on the structural problems of poverty, of international trade, of workers' rights--but rarely if ever do such studies speak directly to the excesses of the wealthy, including the middle classes of advanced economies. What happened? Why has the unquenchable pursuit of a luxury lifestyle gotten a free pass? In interpreting luxury as a moral problem, Cloutier proposes a new approach to economic ethics that moves beyond pro-market v. anti-market screeds and focuses attention on our everyday economic choices. In Part 1 he surveys the history of Christian attitudes toward luxury and greed and provides a primer on economics; in Part 2 he examines the meaning of luxury and how to develop a prudential ethic of consumption that is compatible with Christian morality.

Chapter 1. Why Luxury? -- Chapter 2. Luxury in History : A Brief Survey -- Chapter 3. Neglected Vice : How Luxury Degrades Us, Our Work, and Our Communities -- Chapter 4. Neglected Sacramentality : Why Luxury Blocks a Spirituality of our Material Goods -- Chapter 5. Neglecting Positionality : Why Luxury Does Not Necessarily Help the Economy -- Chapter 6. Luxury Defined -- Chapter 7. Luxury and Social Context : Who Has More Than Enough? -- Chapter 8. Luxury and Necessity : What is Enough? -- Chapter 9. Luxury and Sacrament : What's Beyond Enough? -- Conclusion. Resisting with Discipline, Responding with Hope.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> David Cloutier is associate professor at Mount Saint Mary's University. He is the author of Love, Reason, and God's Story: An Introduction to Catholic Sexual Ethics and editor of the blog catholicmoraltheology.com.</p>

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