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Bike lanes are White lanes : bicycle advocacy and urban planning / Melody L Hoffmann.

By: Hoffmann, Melody L [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 196 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803288225; 0803288220; 9780803288201; 0803288204.Subject(s): Bicycle commuting -- Social aspects -- United States | Bicycle lanes -- United States | City planning -- United States | Zoning, Exclusionary -- United States | Community development, Urban -- United States | Racism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Bike lanes are white lanesDDC classification: 338.3/472 Other classification: SOC026030 | SOC001000 | POL002000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "The number of bicyclists are increasing in the United States, especially among the working class and people of color. In contrast to the demographics of bicyclists in the United States, advocacy for bicycling has focused mainly on the interests of white, upwardly mobile bicyclists, leading to neighborhood conflicts and accusations of racist planning. In Bike Lanes Are White Lanes, scholar Melody L. Hoffmann argues that the bicycle has varied cultural meaning as a "rolling signifier." That is, the bicycle's meaning changes in different spaces, with different people, and in different cultures. The rolling signification of the bicycle contributes to building community, influences gentrifying urban planning, and upholds systemic race and class barriers. In this study of three prominent U.S. cities--Milwaukee, Portland, and Minneapolis--Hoffmann examines how the burgeoning popularity of urban bicycling is trailed by systemic issues of racism, classism, and displacement. From a pro-cycling perspective, Bike Lanes Are White Lanes highlights many problematic aspects of urban bicycling culture and its advocacy as well as positive examples of people trying earnestly to bring their community together through bicycling. "-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "This study of three prominent U.S. cities--Milwaukee, Portland, and Minneapolis--examines how the burgeoning popularity of urban bicycling is trailed by systemic issues of racism, classism, and displacement"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HE5737 .H64 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d4v13q Available ocn936433444

"The number of bicyclists are increasing in the United States, especially among the working class and people of color. In contrast to the demographics of bicyclists in the United States, advocacy for bicycling has focused mainly on the interests of white, upwardly mobile bicyclists, leading to neighborhood conflicts and accusations of racist planning. In Bike Lanes Are White Lanes, scholar Melody L. Hoffmann argues that the bicycle has varied cultural meaning as a "rolling signifier." That is, the bicycle's meaning changes in different spaces, with different people, and in different cultures. The rolling signification of the bicycle contributes to building community, influences gentrifying urban planning, and upholds systemic race and class barriers. In this study of three prominent U.S. cities--Milwaukee, Portland, and Minneapolis--Hoffmann examines how the burgeoning popularity of urban bicycling is trailed by systemic issues of racism, classism, and displacement. From a pro-cycling perspective, Bike Lanes Are White Lanes highlights many problematic aspects of urban bicycling culture and its advocacy as well as positive examples of people trying earnestly to bring their community together through bicycling. "-- Provided by publisher.

"This study of three prominent U.S. cities--Milwaukee, Portland, and Minneapolis--examines how the burgeoning popularity of urban bicycling is trailed by systemic issues of racism, classism, and displacement"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on June 06, 2016).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Melody L. Hoffmann is an instructor of communication studies and journalism at Anoka Ramsey Community College. Her work has been anthologized in Culture on Two Wheels: The Bicycle in Literature and Film (Nebraska, 2016).<br>

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