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A bun in the oven : how the food and birth movements resist industrialization / Barbara Katz Rothman.

By: Rothman, Barbara Katz [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resource (vii, 253 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479846023; 1479846023.Subject(s): Lifestyles -- United States | Natural childbirth -- United States | Natural foods -- United States | Social movements -- United States | Feminism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Bun in the oven.DDC classification: 303.48/4 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A tale of two social movements -- Artisanal workers -- No place like home -- Living the embodied life -- Two movements in three phases: an introduction -- Phase one: scientific society -- Phase two: consumer society -- Phase three: the counterculture -- The risky business of life -- Great expectations: a childbirth movement for now.
Summary: There are people dedicated to improving the way we eat, and people dedicated to improving the way we give birth. A Bun in the Oven is the first comparison of these two social movements. The food movement has seemingly exploded, but little has changed in the diet of most Americans. And while there's talk of improving the childbirth experience, most births happen in large hospitals, about a third result in C-sections, and the US does not fare well in infant or maternal outcomes. In A Bun in the Oven Barbara Katz Rothman traces the food and the birth movements through three major phases over the course of the 20th century in the United States: from the early 20th century era of scientific management; through to the consumerism of Post World War II with its 'turn to the French' in making things gracious; to the late 20th century counter-culture midwives and counter-cuisine cooks. The book explores the tension throughout all of these eras between the industrial demands of mass-management and profit-making, and the social movements--composed largely of women coming together from very different feminist sensibilities--which are working to expose the harmful consequences of industrialization, and make birth and food both meaningful and healthy. Katz Rothman, an internationally recognized sociologist named 'midwife to the movement' by the Midwives Alliance of North America, turns her attention to the lessons to be learned from the food movement, and the parallel forces shaping both of these consumer-based social movements. In both movements, issues of the natural, the authentic, and the importance of 'meaningful' and 'personal' experiences get balanced against discussions of what is sensible, convenient and safe. And both movements operate in a context of commercial and corporate interests, which places profit and efficiency above individual experiences and outcomes. A Bun in the Oven brings new insight into the relationship between our most intimate, personal experiences, the industries that control them, and the social movements that resist the industrialization of life and seek to birth change.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ2044.U6 R67 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt18040x2 Available ocn937455074

A tale of two social movements -- Artisanal workers -- No place like home -- Living the embodied life -- Two movements in three phases: an introduction -- Phase one: scientific society -- Phase two: consumer society -- Phase three: the counterculture -- The risky business of life -- Great expectations: a childbirth movement for now.

There are people dedicated to improving the way we eat, and people dedicated to improving the way we give birth. A Bun in the Oven is the first comparison of these two social movements. The food movement has seemingly exploded, but little has changed in the diet of most Americans. And while there's talk of improving the childbirth experience, most births happen in large hospitals, about a third result in C-sections, and the US does not fare well in infant or maternal outcomes. In A Bun in the Oven Barbara Katz Rothman traces the food and the birth movements through three major phases over the course of the 20th century in the United States: from the early 20th century era of scientific management; through to the consumerism of Post World War II with its 'turn to the French' in making things gracious; to the late 20th century counter-culture midwives and counter-cuisine cooks. The book explores the tension throughout all of these eras between the industrial demands of mass-management and profit-making, and the social movements--composed largely of women coming together from very different feminist sensibilities--which are working to expose the harmful consequences of industrialization, and make birth and food both meaningful and healthy. Katz Rothman, an internationally recognized sociologist named 'midwife to the movement' by the Midwives Alliance of North America, turns her attention to the lessons to be learned from the food movement, and the parallel forces shaping both of these consumer-based social movements. In both movements, issues of the natural, the authentic, and the importance of 'meaningful' and 'personal' experiences get balanced against discussions of what is sensible, convenient and safe. And both movements operate in a context of commercial and corporate interests, which places profit and efficiency above individual experiences and outcomes. A Bun in the Oven brings new insight into the relationship between our most intimate, personal experiences, the industries that control them, and the social movements that resist the industrialization of life and seek to birth change.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In her cleverly titled book, sociologist Rothman (CUNY) juxtaposes two consumer movements--home birth and food--that were born in the social upheaval of the 1960s in the US. These social movements challenge the large industrial complex of the biomedical industry and agribusiness, which threaten to rob individuals of agency and freedom. The movements strike at the heart of two intimate bodily arenas--what people eat and how they give birth. This much is clear, and Rothman argues persuasively for the advocacy of scholars such as herself. The author's own expertise is in the field of midwifery; the book's strength is her discussion of this subject. The main shortcoming, however, is the book's central framework--the juxtaposition of birth and food, with only a limited amount to be gained by the dual discussion. Readers sense the strain in sustaining the conversation, even while wanting more consideration of issues such as social class and race. Furthermore, Rothman's writing is often too personal, anecdotal, and even slangy--blog style. These topics affect people broadly and deeply, warranting greater yield when disentangled from each other. Summing Up: Optional. Public libraries, general collections. --Christine Reiko Yano, University of Hawai'i

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