Restricted access : media, disability, and the politics of participation / Elizabeth Ellcessor.

By: Ellcessor, Elizabeth [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPostmillennial pop: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2016]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479865789; 1479865788Subject(s): Accessible Web sites for people with disabilities | Computers and people with disabilities | Internet access | People with disabilities | Discrimination against people with disabilities | Digital media -- Social aspectsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Restricted accessDDC classification: 025.04087 LOC classification: HV1568.4 | .E45 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Regulating digital media accessibility : #CaptionTHIS -- You already know how to use it : technology, disability, and participation -- Transformers : accessibility, style, and adaptation -- Content warnings : struggles over meaning, rights, and equality -- The net experience : intersectional identities and cultural accessibility.
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HV1568.4 .E45 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt18040rg Available ocn938018332

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 227-238) and index.

Regulating digital media accessibility : #CaptionTHIS -- You already know how to use it : technology, disability, and participation -- Transformers : accessibility, style, and adaptation -- Content warnings : struggles over meaning, rights, and equality -- The net experience : intersectional identities and cultural accessibility.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The tyranny of the normal is always with us even as it moves into the realm of digital technology. The new normal is that everyone has financial, physical, mental, emotional, and cultural access to this technology and that it is easy to use. The prototype for the user is an educated, technologically savvy, youngish, able white male. This excludes the rest of us and creates a never-ending race to catch up as each new device and software program is dangled before us. Perhaps the most pernicious assumption is that digital technology will bring full participation in society and equality for people with disabilities. The use of a phenomenological methodology to explore these assumptions makes for a powerful understanding of how bodies are part of the digital technology experience and how each body is not the same. The assumption here is that if we ignore the splendid diversity of the users, then we will create equality through the use of this technology. Ellcessor (Indiana Univ.) calls for cultural collaboration that does not exclude disability culture or attempt to erase disability culture in the name of universal design. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. --Patricia A. Murphy, University of Toledo

Author notes provided by Syndetics

EllcessorElizabeth:

Elizabeth Ellcessor is Assistant Professor of media studies at the University of Virginia.

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